OEDA https://ohioeda.com Ohio Economic Development Association Wed, 23 Feb 2022 19:34:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://ohioeda.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/cropped-OEDA-icon-small-32x32.png OEDA https://ohioeda.com 32 32 Economic Development Officer – MORPC – Columbus, Ohio https://ohioeda.com/economic-development-officer-morpc-columbus-ohio/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 19:34:23 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14249

As  Central  Ohio’s  regional  council,  MORPC  is  an  association of  cities,  villages,  townships, counties  and  regional  organizations  and serves  rural,  suburban,  and  urban areas.  We take  pride in bringing communities  of  all  sizes  and interests  together  to collaborate on best  practices  and plan for  the  future  of  our  growing region.  We  do  this  through  a  variety  of  programs,  services, projects  and initiatives  –  all  with the goal  of  improving the lives  of  our  residents  and  making Central  Ohio stand out  on  the  world stage. One of  Central  Ohio’s  greatest  strengths  is  the  diversity  of  our  communities,  and  to  best  serve our  region,  MORPC  assertively  values  diversity  and inclusion and  strives  to  reflect  those  values in our  team,  our  work,  and our  positive impact  for  the  region.  Our  work  progresses  when our team  can draw  on  a wide  range  of  personal  experiences  and backgrounds,  and when each member  is  open  to learning from  the  experiences  of  others,  both internally  and externally.  As  an equal  opportunity  employer,  we  fully  support  all  applicable state and  federal  laws  and regulations  and  do not  discriminate  against  applicants  for  employment  or  employees  because of race,  color,  creed,  religion,  ancestry,  national  origin,  sexual  orientation,  sex  or  gender,  gender identity  or  expression,  pregnancy,  medical  conditions,    age,  disability  or  other  handicap,  genetic information,  marital/familial  status,  veteran  status,  military  status,  or  income  or  status  with regard  to  public  assistance in any  aspects  of  our  personnel  policies,  working conditions,  or hiring and recruitment.   To create and  nourish  a  workforce as  diverse  as  the Central  Ohio  region,  MORPC  encourages members  of  groups  traditionally  underrepresented  in  local  government  and  professional positions  to  apply  for  our  open career  opportunities. MORPC recognizes  the  value of  a  healthy  work/life balance  for  our  team  members  and  as  such, we provide  a variety  of  benefits  to  promote  that  balance.  Eligible  employees  receive  a  free system-wide  transit  pass  and discounted access  to other  alternative  transportation modes  to provide options  for  commuting  to work.  MORPC  encourages  opportunities  for  career advancement  through  generous  tuition  and  professional  development  incentives,  leadership programs,  and participation in local  and national  organizations.  For  eligible permanent  positions, MORPC also  offers  flexible schedules  and  remote work  options  as  well  as  paid time off  and holidays.  MORPC  employees  may  also  be eligible for  excellent  health,  vision and dental insurance,  employee  assistance programs,  employer  paid  short-term  &  long-term  disability coverage,  employer  paid  life insurance  in  the amount  of  $50,000 coverage,  participation in  the Ohio Public  Employees  Retirement  System,  plus  two Deferred Compensation Plans  that employees  can  opt  into  for  additional  retirement  funding.  More info can  be  found  in the  benefits link  within the online posting.   

The Mid-Ohio Regional  Planning Commission (MORPC)  is  seeking a  Economic  Development Officer  on  the  Programming Team.  Under  administrative  direction of  the  Chief  Regional Development  Officer  and  Senior  Director  of  Programming,  The Economic  Development  Officer  is responsible  for  directing  and  developing  agency  economic  development  and  strategic  infrastructure programming  and  performs  related duties  as  required.   The  Economic  Development  Officer  is  an officer-level  position,  with  subordinate management  responsibilities  and  regular  reporting  to  senior agency  leadership  and  the Executive  Director.   The  position requires  planning and  coordination spurred from  maintaining  relationships  and acting promptly  on project  development  for  relevant  economic  development  stakeholders, including One Columbus,  USEDA,  USEPA,  regional  Lead Economic  Development  Officials, COTA,  workforce  development  entities,  and  others. The  Economic  Development  Officer  is  often  tapped to  provide  information to  the  Executive Director  and is  considered a  trusted  member  the  agency’s  Leadership  Team.  A  successful candidate is  self-motivated,  metric-driven  and encourages  the  success  of  MORPC  colleagues and members.

 

Examples of Duties

  • Oversee  preparation of  the application for  the Columbus  Region Economic  Development District  (CREDD).
  • Lead the implementation  and provide periodic  updates  of  the Columbus  Region Comprehensive Economic  Development  Strategy  (CEDS).
  • Oversee implementation  and compliance  related  to the  United States  Economic Development  Administration (USEDA)  grant  to  MORPC  for  economic  recovery.
  • Oversee implementation  and compliance  related  to the  United States  Environmental Protection Agency  (USEPA)  grant  to  MORPC  for  brownfield assessment  related to redevelopment.
  • Lead bi-annual  update of  the  Competitive Advantage Projects  (CAP)  program,  and  provide ongoing technical  assistance,  including  project  strategy  development  and  strategic  funding assistance.
  • Broadly  support  other  agency  planning projects  with economic  development  components.

 

Typical Qualifications

The  Economic  Development  Officer  should possess  a working knowledge  of  the principles, practices  and techniques  of  public  administration and planning.  Good communication (written and oral)  abilities  and a strong knowledge of  Microsoft  Office software are essential.  The successful candidate must  have the  ability  to maintain a positive working relationship with peers,  the public, and outside agencies.   Should have a valid driver’s  license,  good driving record and maintain liability  coverage as required by  MORPC.  Should be willing to use  agency  or  personal  vehicle with mileage reimbursed to conduct  MORPC  business.  Essential  functions  include the ability  to use phone,  computer,  and conduct  professional  meetings.  MORPC  has  a flexible work  environment  which allows  for  some remote work  capabilities.  However,  this  position will  have the expectation to work  in-person most often. 

Acceptable Experience  and  Training: 

  • Completion of  a bachelor’s  degree in  City  and  Regional  Planning,  Economics,  Public Administration,  Political  Science  or  comparable  subject  matter  from  an accredited  college or university.
  • A minimum  of  five years  of  experience is  required.  
  • Applicants  with additional  accreditations  and  advanced degrees  in appropriate  fields  of study  are given  preference in the  application process. Essential  Functions:
  • Prepares  research,  planning reports,  and  summaries.
  • Presents  reports  and  represents  MORPC  in a  non-policymaking capacity  to government officials,  citizen groups,  professional  organizations,  etc.
  • Represents  MORPC  in various  public  forums  including public  involvement  meetings,  and inter-agency  coordination meetings.
  • Assists  with  updating  MORPC  planning and program  documents. •  Maintains  working  knowledge of  federal  and  state  guidelines.

 

Supplemental Information

MORPC is  an EOE/AAP  employer.  

Please apply  online at  http://www.morpc.org/careers/  or  you may  mail  a resume to  or  complete  an  application at  MORPC,  111 Liberty  St.,  Suite  100, Columbus,  OH  43215  ATTN:  PG-1-22 

CLICK HERE for more information.

Due to  the  high number  of  expected  applicants,  we cannot  accept  phone  call  inquiries. 

www.morpc.org

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio https://ohioeda.com/a-team-effort-bringing-intel-to-ohio/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 16:36:07 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14246

J.P. Nauseef
JobsOhio

 

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

The megaproject will make Ohio a magnet to attract business and retain and attract talent from across the globe, as Ohio will be rightfully viewed as the center for the most advanced and complex manufacturing in the world.

Ohio won the largest economic deal in our history by doing what we have always done well: Working together and collaborating toward a common goal. Starting with strong leadership from the DeWine/Husted Administration, through collaboration amongst the JobsOhio team and its Regional Network Partners across the state, critical support from the New Albany Company, Licking County and surrounding Central Ohio communities and Ohio’s bipartisan Congressional Delegation, and our state’s leading business chambers and trade associations – Intel is in Ohio. Truly a team effort!

Ohio has made a point to create a favorable business climate. It has structured its economic development efforts to allow the state to be nimble, act quickly, and do what is necessary to compete with other states to attract new businesses and talent– and this project HAD to move at the speed of business.

Within one week, JobsOhio scoured the entire state – and each region that met basic demographic criteria had the opportunity to identify a site that met Intel’s unique requirements. Team Ohio ultimately responded to Intel with a recommendation that would become the future home of the most advanced semiconductor chip manufacturing operation in the world. Thanks to the passion and advocacy of local elected leaders and economic development professionals coupled with the structure and experience of our network, the team had the ability to move at the speed of business and anticipate the needs of Intel.

Intel’s investment is good for the entire state and will catalyze other investments upstream and downstream, like what’s happened in other areas with semiconductor manufacturing facilities worldwide. This is why it is mission-critical for our economic development partners throughout the state to ensure that sites and communities are ready for the influx of businesses and suppliers looking for space in Ohio.

Phase 1 of Intel’s 4-phase plan will include an initial capital investment of more than $20 billion to build two chip manufacturing facilities (FABs) will generate more than 20,000 jobs, including:

    • 3,000 Intel jobs earning an average of $135,000 per year (plus benefits)
    • 7,000 construction jobs over the course of the build
    • Tens of thousands of additional support jobs, including electricians, engineers, supplier jobs, and jobs in restaurants, healthcare, housing, entertainment, and more.

Access to a talent pipeline is essential for Intel’s initial investment, which is why, in collaboration with the DeWine/Husted Administration, JobsOhio, and key stakeholders, Intel has indicated its plans to make significant investments over the next decade in partnership with Ohio universities, community colleges, and the U.S. National Science Foundation. These partnerships will span a range of activities, from collaborative research projects to semiconductor-specific curricula for associate and undergraduate degree programs.

Ohio now realizes its Generational Opportunity that could only have been achieved through the dedication and vision of so many around the state for a common goal that will have far-reaching impacts for years to come. This is the start – a sea change – to what we always knew Ohio could achieve. The best is yet to come…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods https://ohioeda.com/community-partners-outline-plans-for-uptown-cincinnatis-five-core-neighborhoods/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 15:22:16 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14240

Brooke Rapp

 

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

Avondale

As the official voice of Avondale, the Avondale Community Council (ACC) has never been shy about shining a spotlight on what makes Avondale an ideal place to live, work, play and do business. Increasing and improving affordable housing will continue to be one of the organization’s top priorities in the coming year. Making that priority more achievable, said Tony Moore, President of ACC, is Uptown’s enormous potential compared to other Cincinnati neighborhoods.

“We believe that this potential will lead to increased diversity as well as opportunities throughout the city and state,” Moore said.

The growth and development of new and existing businesses are at the forefront of the Avondale Business Association’s (ABA) plans, according to the organization’s Chairman, Bill Witten. He pointed to the committee’s mission to create, nurture, empower and support a strong, diverse economic base as a continued focus.

Meanwhile, the Avondale Development Corporation (ADC) has big plans for the $20 million Fifth Third grant it was awarded last year through Fifth Third’s Neighborhood Investment Program (NIP). The grant will fund real estate development, homeownership, business development and quality-of-life projects for the next three years. Here again, diversity is a key selling point, according to ADC’s Executive Director, Russell Hairston.

“The diversity of the neighborhoods, the partnerships, and the transformative investments in infrastructure, commercial and real estate development and innovation make Uptown unique,” he said.

Clifton

Clifton Town Meeting (CTM), Clifton’s official community council, has directed its 2022 attention toward events, programs and installations that will build on its palpable sense of community. Gerald Checco, CTM’s newly elected President, said a clock tower at the intersection of Clifton and Ludlow avenues will be officially dedicated to COVID-19 first responders when it is installed in March.

Additionally, CTM is planning a summer and spring concert series on the Clifton Plaza, a Fall Street Festival on Ludlow Avenue, and its annual golf outing fundraiser to benefit CTM programming. There will also be three volunteer-based clean-up events to remove litter and graffiti, as well as install new plantings and landscaping.

The Clifton Cultural Arts Center (CCAC) is stepping up in 2022 as well. “CCAC is concentrated on bringing live performing arts series to all five neighborhoods of Uptown,” Checco said.

Corryville

The Short Vine Association (SVA) is predicting a record year of growth and opportunity for merchants, following nearly two years of uncertainty throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Patrice Eby Burke, SVA President, said the Short Vine entertainment district has several projects in the works for 2022.

“In 2022, we hope to build on our ‘clean and safe’ efforts by investing in new signage and wayfinding, upgraded Living Wall infrastructure, street lighting, public safety and robust events,” Burke said.

The reason Burke believes Uptown stands out is its walkable areas and successful business districts. Additionally, Dan Luther with the Corryville Community Development Corporation shared that Piada will be opening a location soon in Stetson Square.

CUF

The Clifton Heights-University Heights-Fairview Neighborhood Association (CUFNA) has high expectations for the year ahead. The organization is working with developers on at least four major projects this year, all of which are in varying stages of development, said Jack Martin of the CUFNA Board of Trustees.

These projects include:

  • The District at Clifton Heights: A mixed-use development by Trinitas Ventures at the former Deaconess Hospital site.
  • Block 1: A mixed-use development by the Clifton Heights Community Urban Redevelopment Corporation (CHCURC) at McMillan, Vine, Calhoun and Scioto streets.
  • Hallmar Central Park: A student housing development by Fountain Residential Partners at McMicken, Marshall and Central Parkway.
  • Gateway Lofts: A student housing development by Hallmark Campus Communities at McMillan, Moerlein and Lyon.

CUFNA is also working with the City of Cincinnati to implement recommendations from the CUF Parking and Transportation Analysis. Improvements at Bellevue Hill Park—based largely on the results of a public survey conducted last summer—are also being made, Martin said.

Matt Bourgeois, Director of CHCURC, said his organization is continuing its efforts to stabilize vacant and abandoned homes in CUF communities.

“In 2022, CHCURC plans to directly intervene, through receivership or acquisition, five properties representing approximately 10 units,” Bourgeois said. CHCURC is also working to develop the two-acre site at the corner of Vine and Calhoun streets to serve as a gateway to the Clifton Heights neighborhood and the University of Cincinnati. Another priority is to bring additional workforce housing to the area.

Martin believes Uptown’s attractions, amenities, and institutions such as the University of Cincinnati, hospitals, and the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden—as well as other educational, cultural and entertainment destinations—add to the overall appeal of the city.

Mt. Auburn

The Mt. Auburn Chamber of Commerce (MACOC) has dedicated itself to continuing to foster relationships in the community.

“MACOC is seeking to re-establish itself as a conduit of networking, growth and positive efforts on behalf of the community,” said Rob Festenstein, Executive Director of MACOC. “Even in the COVID era of virtual meetings, we want to capitalize on the enthusiasm of our members and stakeholders.”

Festenstein said he often refers to Uptown as an “oasis” within Cincinnati, with “diverse businesses, history, populations and on the cusp of continued transformation.”

Director of Community Development, Brooke Rapp, agrees with Festenstein’s sentiment. “The last two years have been difficult, uncertain and frustrating for our residents, business owners, partner organizations and member institutions,” Rapp said. “But one thing is immediately clear from the way Uptown’s community groups have responded: the collaborative, innovative and committed nature of these neighborhood groups underscore just how special Uptown is. I can’t wait to see what the year has in store.”

For more information on Uptown, visit uptowncincinnati.com.

 

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Grants Can Help Grow Your Business Internationally https://ohioeda.com/grants-can-help-grow-your-business-internationally-2/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 15:12:35 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14235

Dan Bowerman
Ohio Department of Development

 

The International Market Access Grant for Exporters (IMAGE) provides eligible businesses a 50% reimbursement of up to $10,000 for activities that promote international business. Activities include:

  • Website development
  • International advertising
  • E-commerce
  • Search engine optimization (SEO)
  • Marketing and website translation
  • Compliance testing
  • Trade shows (international, domestic, and virtual)
  • EXIM credit insurance premiums

The third application period will open March 1 and closes April 7, 2022. Funding for the third round can be used for activities between April 1 and June 30, 2022. Additional IMAGE funding opportunities will be announced quarterly subject to funding availability.

Applications must be approved before starting grant activities. For more information and to apply, visit IMAGE.Development.Ohio.Gov, email IMAGE@Development.Ohio.Gov, or contact an Ohio SBDC Export Assistance Network director near you.

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Economic Development and Educational Leaders Build Back Better Together https://ohioeda.com/economic-development-and-educational-leaders-build-back-better-together/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 15:07:14 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14232

Dr. Vicki King-Maple
TPMA

 

Just two years ago, we were attentively exploring solutions for mobilizing industry, education, and policymakers as each recognized the urgency and criticality of the workforce gap and skills shortage sweeping the nation.

Spring forward, and the concerns of how to conjointly address such challenges have been exacerbated. The urgency of restructuring strategic direction since the global disruption has caused businesses to pivot, and the burden to rebuild and rebound is heavy.

The growth of uncertainty and shifts in employment and the economy have forced more innovative efforts, combining solution strategies among industry, education, and government. Progressive communities are elevating strategic workforce and economic growth priorities.

The proactive steps of employers are applauded as they are offering to upskill or cross-skill staff remotely in preparation for increased productivity demands.  Ecosystems made up of educational administrators, economic development leaders, and workforce practitioners actively assess workforce priorities; recognizing what were once the top drivers of workforce development needs have likely changed over the course of several devastating months and years filled with uncertainty. Being proactive and responsive in pushing recovery and sustainability efforts forward for employers, many institutions quickly converted prominently requested and relevant training programs to an accelerated, remote delivery system with germane topics being delivered virtually.

The strategic and significant efforts of workforce education remain an ever-changing challenge. Technical and community colleges have traditionally been located within the heart of regional labor markets and deserve to be recognized as players in strengthening the industry network of economic ecosystems. They were leaders in initiating and advancing far-reaching impacts prior to the pandemic, consistently providing accessible, affordable, and responsive workforce education to prepare individuals for self-sustaining and family-sustaining careers with little to no student loan debt. They continue to prove pivotal to strengthening the economy, yielding strong returns on investments for stakeholders, ranging from employers and government entities to taxpayers and the workforce alike.

Many colleges and universities are exploring or strengthening Business & Industry (B&I) Engagement Processes as part of today’s solution strategy. These processes are centric to gauging and addressing employer challenges and workforce gaps as the institutions are helping to fill the talent pipeline; providing training for incumbent workers; placing skilled individuals into internship opportunities; engaging in career exploration events.

Similarly, economic developers are bolstering their Business Retention & Expansion (BR&E) models. They are discovering the benefits of more actively involving local educational institutions and training providers; thus, illuminating the parallels between B&I engagement processes and BR&E models.

While the phrase ‘build back better’ is used as a theme to revitalize regional economies through federal grant funds, there is also merit to emphasizing the benefits of educators, economic development leaders, and workforce practitioners to rally and to ‘build back better’ as a consortia. From workforce development strategic planning and visioning, industry-driven career pathway crafting, coalition building, and the design and launch of sector partnerships and work-based learning programs, to collaborative visioning and strategic planning, implementation of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI), and talent attraction program development, the collaborative efforts of industry and education are at the heart of recovery strategies as all work synergistically to provide solutions as together, we ‘build back better.’

 

Author Information

Dr. Vicki King-Maple is a national senior director at TPMA. Previously a vice president for economic development and workforce solutions for a community college in central Ohio, she also completed a term as a national commissioner for Economic Development and Workforce Solutions for the American Association of Community Colleges. Vicki is an accomplished and recognized state and national presenter, panelist, editorial contributor, researcher, and consultant. She has presented for the Ohio Economic Development Association conference and the National Council on Workforce Education conference emphasizing the theme of colleges as economic and workforce development partners. She completed a doctorate of educational leadership at Ashland University with dissertation research being The Technical College’s Role in Bridging the Workforce Gap.

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Fighting Stigma Helps Support a Strong Ohio Workforce https://ohioeda.com/fighting-stigma-helps-support-a-strong-ohio-workforce/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 14:59:18 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14227

Pat Tiberi
Ohio Business Roundtable

 

 

Ohio’s business leaders have known for a long time the toll that addiction and untreated mental illness take on workforce readiness and the challenges that poses for economic development.

Among industries facing labor shortages, many of the jobs remain unfilled because so many prospects fail drug screenings. Within companies, people living with substance use disorder and mental illness often miss work or are less productive because of their conditions.

Mind Share Partners, a provider of mental health resources for companies, produced “Mental Health at Work” reports in 2019 and in 2021 that together show the pandemic’s dramatic impact on workplace mental health. While the 2019 report showed 61% of workers saying their productivity was affected by their mental health, the 2021 report reflected “near-universal” mental health challenges.

Eighty-four percent of employees in 2021 named at least one workplace factor as negatively affecting their mental health, leading workers to miss an average of 8 days for mental health reasons. And during an historic labor shortage, mental health challenges are fueling employee turnover: The Mind Share survey found that half of full-time U.S. workers have left a previous job at least in part because of mental health reasons. For Millennial respondents, the figure is 68%; for Gen Z, it’s 81%.

The monetary cost also is significant. A set of calculators produced for the National Safety Council estimate that, for a company with 200 employees, untreated mental illness costs an additional $336,000 per year in lost time, health care, turnover and retraining. Substance misuse costs the same company an average of $158,000 per year.

Smart employers are taking steps to address these problems, with employee assistance programs and company policies that allow for and encourage treatment for behavioral health problems. Federal and state laws require parity for mental health coverage — that is, health insurance plans must cover mental health conditions and substance use disorders in the same or a similar way to how they cover medical and surgical services.

All of these are good steps toward overcoming behavioral health challenges, but another major obstacle still can get in the way: the stigma that too many people hold toward those with addiction or mental illness.

The unfounded belief that mental illness and addiction are the result of character flaws — that people are to blame for their own illness — causes many people with behavioral health issues to try to hide them and discourages them from seeking treatment that could make them better. For some, the stigma is strictly internal but equally destructive. The most generous employee assistance program in the world won’t do much good if people aren’t willing to use it.

That’s why the Ohio Business Roundtable is proud to be part of the Ohio Opioid Education Alliance, whose new public education campaign takes on stigma directly. Via TV and radio ads, news stories, social media and online publications, the “Beat the Stigma” campaign will stress that addiction and mental illness are biological diseases, rooted largely in genetics and environmental factors outside a person’s control.

The statewide campaign asks Ohioans to do three things:

  • Challenge what you know about addiction and mental illness.
  • Know that a family history of addiction or mental illness is the strongest single predictor of addiction or mental illness..
  • Take care of your mental health, because mental illness can be a trigger for addiction.

The more we can push back against stigma, the more success we’ll have building a healthy workforce to move Ohio forward.

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Loan Closing and Servicing Officer – OSDC – Columbus, Ohio https://ohioeda.com/loan-closing-and-servicing-officer/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 16:03:21 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14222

Employer:  Ohio Statewide Development Corporation

Job Title:  Loan Closing and Servicing Officer

Work Hours:  Full-Time; Flexible hours can be arranged

Salary:  $60,000 – $70,000

Reports to:  Executive Director

Location:  1650 Lake Shore Drive, Suite 240, Columbus, OH 43204;
Partial remote work capabilities may be available after initial training period

Benefits:  SIMPLE IRA Retirement Plan with 3% employer match; Mileage Reimbursement;
Medical, Dental, & Vision insurance; Paid Holidays; 20 Days Paid Time Off

Company Overview:
Non-profit organization working in small business commercial real estate and equipment lending. Lending done in partnership with private lenders, utilizing the public sector financing programs—specifically the U.S. Small Business Administration 504 Loan Program and the Ohio 166 Regional Loan Program.

Position Overview:
Seeking detail-oriented, self-starter with experience working on commercial loans. Individual should enjoy working in team setting with ability to multi-task and manage multiple deadlines. Significant on-the-job training available for individuals who demonstrate ability to learn quickly and interest in taking ownership of job responsibilities.

Job Duties:
• Coordinate closing of SBA 504 and Ohio 166 loans, working with small businesses and OSDC legal counsel. Process includes collection of documents from lending partners and borrowers, analysis of financial statements, preparation of legal documents, and meeting with borrowers to explain documents and obtain signatures.
• Work with small businesses and OSDC Loan Officers to complete servicing actions for existing SBA 504 and Ohio 166 loans. Includes analysis of financial statements, preparation of memos in support of proposed action, and preparation of legal documents to amend existing loan requirements
• Complete annual risk rating for SBA 504 and Ohio 166 loans
• Process paid in full loans and oversee release of collateral
• When necessary, make recommendations to OSDC and SBA on liquidation of SBA 504 loans
• Provide written and oral reports to OSDC Executive Director and OSDC Board of Directors on status of portfolio and problem loans
• Develop process improvements where applicable and implement with colleagues. e.g. preparing reports on existing loan portfolio, streamlining closing process, improving document retention processes, etc.

Qualifications:
• Three years of experience in commercial lending OR bachelor’s degree in finance, accounting, business administration, or related field
• Excellent written & verbal communication skills with strong attention to detail is a must
• Computer skills including use of Microsoft Office Suite and Adobe software systems is required.
• Valid driver’s license is required
• Experience reading, preparing, and executing loan documents is a plus
• SBA lending experience is a plus
• Registered Public Notary is a plus

Submit resume with cover letter to Michael Kinninger, Executive Director, at mkinninger@osdc.net. Because this position requires strong communication skills and attention to detail, extra consideration will be given to candidates that submit a thorough, well-written cover letter.

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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TSEP seeks Economic Development Manager (Tiffin, Ohio) https://ohioeda.com/tsep-seeks-economic-development-manager-tiffin-ohio/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 15:11:25 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14214

The Tiffin-Seneca Economic Partnership (TSEP) is seeking someone to manage its industrial, commercial and residential development activities and join one of the most dynamic and successful local economic development organizations in the country. Created in 1983, TSEP is a 501c3 public-private partnership that acts as the economic development agent for Tiffin and rural Seneca County in northwest Ohio (population 55,000).

According to Site Selection magazine, Seneca County has ranked in the top ten among micropolitans nationally four of the past five years (top 1-2%), and last year TSEP won the OEDA Excellence in Innovation award. We have a team of seven, with staff covering economic, downtown, workforce, community, and rural development, as well as entrepreneurship and operations.

The specific title and competitive salary depend on the level of experience; no experience is required but is certainly welcome. The ideal candidate will be smart, hard-working, will get along with people and get things done.

Check out full details at tseptalent.com, where videos and additional information is available, such as a full position description and detailed explanations about our workplace advantage, which we call TSEP Thrive. In addition to having an amazing purpose and mission, which all economic development positions enjoy, we also offer the following:

 

Flexibility & Benefits

We want our people to work hard, but we believe work needs to support each team member’s life goals and aspirations, to provide work-life balance. We offer flex time, comp time, flex hours, partial remote work, flex holiday, paid time off, and casual Fridays, in addition to benefits like medical, vision, and dental insurance, retirement match, raises and performance bonuses, cell phone reimbursement and clothing allowance. We even hand-deliver you your locally roasted and brewed coffee drink of choice every Monday morning to start off the week.

 

Coaching & Professional Development

Our management style centers around coaching and developing close relationships between colleagues, and we value people as employees, teammates, and people. At TSEP, employees have frequent one-to-one feedback and mentorship sessions with leadership and attend weekly team meetings. TSEP will also work with the new employee to develop a customized professional development plan.

 

Growth Opportunities

People who work for TSEP are presented with exciting career opportunities both inside and outside the organization because team members benefit from our extensive network, exceptional reputation, and the high-profile nature of our work. At TSEP, we want our people to stay for as long as it is the best decision for them, and we have a structured internal progression system: Specialist, Coordinator, Manager, Director, and Vice President.

 

Culture

Not only do people want purpose in their day-to-day work, but they also seek companies with an excellent culture. TSEP offers a work-life family experience, where team members respect, support, and like each other, and like the challenging, stimulating, and rewarding work we get to do.

 

Again, check out more details at tseptalent.com. Experience history (resumes, LinkedIn profile) and statements of interest (cover letter, email) will be accepted at tsepsearch@tiffinseneca.org until 5:00 p.m. on Friday, March 11, 2022.

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

]]>
Montrose Group 2020 Corporate Site Location Trends https://ohioeda.com/electric-vehicles-to-drive-major-corporate-site-location-projects/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 19:49:55 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14206

Electric Vehicles to Drive Major Corporate Site Location Projects

Nickolas Otto in 1876 invented the four-stroke internal combustion engine in which in which combustion occurs (aka burning) inside the engine rather than in a separate furnace generating motive power by the burning of fuels such as petrol and oil.[i]  Considering the fact that the $3.6 T global automobile industry[ii] for the most part still runs on oil in an internal combustion engine, Otto’s invention has had a pretty good run.  Signs are that run is going to slow substantially and the global automobile industry is going to undergo a major transformation as the manufacture and sales of electric vehicles (EV) is on the rise.

All-EVs have an electric motor instead of an internal combustion engine.[iii] The vehicle uses a large traction battery pack to power the electric motor and must be plugged in to a wall outlet or charging equipment.[iv] Because it runs on electricity, the vehicle emits no exhaust from a tailpipe and does not contain the typical liquid fuel components, such as a fuel pump, fuel line, or fuel tank.[v]

 

Source: U.S. Department of Energy

 

In an electric drive vehicle, the auxiliary battery provides electricity to power vehicle accessories, and the charge port allows the vehicle to connect to an external power supply in order to charge the traction battery pack.[vi]  This device converts higher-voltage DC power from the traction battery pack to the lower-voltage DC power needed to run vehicle accessories and recharge the auxiliary battery.[vii]  Using power from the traction battery pack, this motor drives the vehicle’s wheels.[viii] Some vehicles use motor generators that perform both the drive and regeneration functions and take the incoming AC electricity supplied via the charge port and converts it to DC power for charging the traction battery that communicates with the charging equipment and monitors battery characteristics such as voltage, current, temperature, and state of charge while charging the pack.[ix] The power electronics controller manages the flow of electrical energy delivered by the traction battery, controlling the speed of the electric traction motor and the torque it produces, and the thermal system maintains a proper operating temperature range of the engine, electric motor, power electronics, and other components.[x]  The traction battery pack stores electricity for use by the electric traction motor, and electric transmission transfers mechanical power from the electric traction motor to drive the wheels.[xi]

The growth in the EV market will be huge.  EV market values are estimated at $171. 26 B in 2020, and it is expected to reach a value of $ 725.14 B by 2026.[xii]  Heavy investments from automakers are expected to cater to the growing demand for EVs, including:

  • Ford committed to spending $11.5 billion on electrifying its vehicle lineup through 2022.[xiii]
  • Mercedes Benz confirmed that it would roll out 25 new plugin hybrid electric vehicles in addition to fully electric vehicles by 2025.
  • GM is on its way to an all-electric future, with a commitment to 30 new global electric vehicles by 2025.[xiv]
  • Toyota aims to produce 3.5 million electric vehicles by 2030, or about one-third of Toyota’s sales before the pandemic with plans to offer 30 battery-powered vehicles by the end of the decade.[xv]
  • Honda has a 40% sales goal of all its vehicle fleet being zero emissions by 2030 and the automaker rolled out projections for the battery electric Honda Prologue SUV set to arrive on sale 2024 with a sales target of 70,000 units for the new model in year one and 500,000 annual sales by 2030.[xvi]
  • Daimler AG (aka Chrysler) is targeting over 70% of sales in Europe and over 40% in the United States to be low-emission vehicles (LEV) by 2030.[xvii]

The disruption in the current automaker supply chain will be equally huge. In an EV, there is no internal combustion engine, fuel system, exhaust system, no oil, little use of the breaks, no transmission, computer software and electrical wiring will play a larger role and the EV battery becomes the lifeblood of the car.[xviii] The $44 B internal combustion engine transmission industry from Dana Corporation to Allison Transmission will need to adapt to a new business model that will impact its current market but possibly create new ones.[xix] Dana Electrified is leading the way to capture this new market by providing leading drivetrain and e-Propulsion technologies for the EV market.[xx] Same goes with the fuel system and exhaust system industry.  The existing automaker supply chain needs to adapt and be open to new business opportunities that in turn create corporate site location and growth opportunities tied to the EV marketplace.  Another market to watch is a new generation of EV automobile manufacturers.  Tesla of course is the company that catches all the headlines but other EV manufacturers include: Bollinger; Byton; Canoo; Faraday Future; Fisker; Lucid; and Rivian.

EV corporate site location projects are landing across the United States. Electric adventure vehicle manufacturer Rivian Inc. will invest $5 billion in a roughly 2,000 acre carbon-conscious campus in Stanton Springs, Georgia which is expected to create 7,500 jobs.[xxi]  STAR EV, a specialized electric vehicle manufacturer, plans to expand operations at its manufacturing center in Simpsonville, South Carolina investing $8.7 million and creating 50 jobs.[xxii]  Ford picked Tennessee for a massive $5.6 billion investment by Ford and battery maker SK Innovation, on a 3,600-acre campus, creating some 5,800 new jobs.[xxiii] Ford also announced a $100 million investment to locate its new global battery center of excellence at its plant in Romulus, Michigan creating 200 jobs.[xxiv]  A leader in the design and manufacturing of zero-emission electric transit vehicles, Proterra will establish new manufacturing operations at Carolina Commerce Center in Greer, South Carolina providing a $76 million investment and creating 200 new jobs.[xxv]

The Ohio and Michigan marketplaces offer prime opportunities for EV investments.  Michigan is number one when it comes to the auto industry and Ohio ranks second. Ohio has nearly 800 firms employing over 40,000 Ohioans in EV industry, and Michigan offers an average manufacturing worker wage rate lower than Tennessee, Georgia and South Carolina. Ohio and Michigan’s rural communities offer a high concentration of manufacturing centers with low wage rates. Ohio and Michigan also benefit from a large array of local and state economic development incentives that should be attractive to the EV industry.

 

Ohio EV Economic Development Incentives

Not to be out done, Michigan offers a wide range of economic development incentives.  The Michigan Business Development Program provides grants, loans and other economic assistance to businesses for highly competitive projects that create jobs and/or provide investment and results in a net-positive return to Michigan.[xxvi] The Jobs Ready Michigan program provides workforce grants for talent recruitment and job training including, but not limited to, employee recruitment expenses, development of customized training development plans, instructor and training materials costs, purchase of equipment related to training, construction of training facilities, and on-the job training costs.[xxvii] The Michigan State Essential Services Assessment maybe exempted for certain projects that meet jobs and capital investment requirements in distressed areas.[xxviii]  Also, the state of Michigan recently enacted legislation to create a $1 billion economic development fund to fund job ready site development projects and a new Critical Industry Investment program to close deals, create and preserve qualified jobs, and bring significant capital investment into Michigan.[xxix]

2021 was just the start for EV corporate site location projects. Expect more corporate site location project growth in 2022 in the growing EV marketplace and Ohio and Michigan are markets likely to gain EV investments in the coming year.

 

____________________________________

[i] https://www.who-invented-the.technology/internal-combustion-engine.htm
[ii] https://www.ibisworld.com/global/market-size/global-car-automobile-sales/
[iii] https://afdc.energy.gov/vehicles/how-do-all-electric-cars-work
[iv] Ibid.
[v] Ibid.
[vi] Ibid.
[vii] Ibid.
[viii] Ibid.
[ix] Ibid.
[x] Ibid.
[xi] Ibid.
[xii] https://www.yahoo.com/now/electric-vehicle-market-growth-trends-095400228.html?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAImVwsf5TDpoL3KPQ8x5aLaMnBmZIlw6DVLC9o5_O30QjlJT4LFkCnhQh9xGHOSp73iZo6EcvTaqIERn_IQL1rB3XBGuJvtDyel5OJKYl1_7RdMvSkljKyWYvq-8EtabIfRN8JFpRKNuWUA-cGfSsw4Sb96HzZ0xd8XA2zUEqtCz
[xiii] Ibid.
[xiv] https://www.gm.com/electric-vehicles
[xv]https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/14/business/toyota-electric-vehicles.html
[xvi] https://www.autoweek.com/news/green-cars/a37691694/hondas-ev-plans/
[xvii] https://www.kbb.com/car-news/stellantis-lays-out-aggressive-ev-plans-for-chrysler-dodge-jeep-ram/
[xviii] https://www.nrdc.org/experts/madhur-boloor/electric-vehicles-101#:~:text=In%20an%20EV%2C%20there%20is,brakes%20changed%20as%20often%20either.
[xix] https://www.ibisworld.com/united-states/market-research-reports/automobile-transmission-manufacturing-industry/
[xx] http://www.danaelectrified.com/
[xxi] https://www.areadevelopment.com/newsitems/12-20-2021/rivian-stanton-springs-georgia.shtml?utm_source=Area+Development+Site+%26+Facility+Planning+Newsletters&utm_campaign=2cfeddaa86-SFP_this_week_551&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_94850a8d43-2cfeddaa86-300584677&goal=0_94850a8d43-2cfeddaa86-300584677
[xxii] https://www.areadevelopment.com/newsitems/7-28-2021/star-ev-manufacturing-simpsonville-south-carolina.shtml
[xxiii] Ibid.
[xxiv] Ibid.
[xxv] https://www.areadevelopment.com/newsItems/12-17-2021/proterra-greer-south-carolina.shtml
[xxvi] Ibid.
[xxvii] Ibid.
[xxviii] Ibid.
[xxix] Ibid.

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

]]>
Tracked House Bills – February 2022 https://ohioeda.com/tracked-house-bills-february-2022/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 18:57:26 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14203

Jeffry Harris
Bricker & Eckler LLP

 

Federal News:

2022 may be the tipping point in sales of electric vehicles:  Market analysts are predicting 2022 may be the year in which sales of cars powered solely by batteries tip into the mainstream.  Data reported for 2021 show such vehicle sales surged in the United States, Europe and China; sales of fossil fuel vehicles were stagnant.

One compelling data point is that electric vehicles accounted for only 2 ½ percent of new vehicle sales in 2019, but were nearly 9 percent of all new cars sold worldwide in 2021.  It could be that 2022 is the year when the internal combustion engine truly began to slide toward obsolescence.

The auto industry is on track to invest $500B during the next five years to transition their assembly plant fleets to electric vehicles.

“It’s one of the biggest industrial transformations probably in the history of capitalism,” Scott Keogh, chief executive of Volkswagen Group of America, said in an interview.

Note that manufacturers of mufflers, fuel injection systems and other parts could go out of business. Nearly three million Americans make, sell and service cars and auto parts; electric cars require fewer workers because the cars have fewer components.

This news is important because most analysts figured that electric vehicles wouldn’t take off until they became as inexpensive to buy as gasoline models, thought to be several years away.  But the transition is occurring on a more rapid timetable than initially thought.

 

134TH GENERAL ASSEMBLY – PROPOSED & ENACTED LEGISLATION
(Changes from last month are noted in BOLD):

HOUSE RESOLUTIONS:

HR 19 INFRASTRUCTURE BANK (Sobecki, L., Stephens, J.)  This resolution urges Congress to create a National Infrastructure Bank to finance urgently needed infrastructure projects.

During sponsor testimony on February 24 in the House Infrastructure & Rural Development Committee, sponsor Rep. Jason Stephens (R-Kitts Hill) noted this resolution is in response to state and local governments’ need for a source of low-interest loans to address infrastructure issues.

HCR 31 (Stephens, J.)  This concurrent resolution urges the Governor and the Director of Transportation to provide for the extension of I-73 and I-74 into Ohio.  Specifically, the measure proposes that I-74 be extended from Cincinnati to Portsmouth, while I-73 would be upgraded through State Route 52 between Huntington and Portsmouth. 

On January 26, 2022 the House adopted the resolution on a vote of 76-15 and the Resolution was offered in the Senate on February 2, 2022.

HR 35 PROPERTY TAX COMMITTEE (Troy, D.)  This resolution seeks to authorize the creation of the temporary House Select Committee on Property Tax Education and Reform.  The 10-member Committee would provide the Ohio General Assembly with a better understanding of the history and purpose of Ohio’s property tax laws, and would include a review of exemptions to property taxes.  The resolution had its first hearing before the House Ways & Means Committee on May 18, 2021.

HOUSE BILLS:

HB 2 BROADBAND SERVICES (Carfagna, R., Stewart, B.) Introduced on February 4, 2021, this bill concerns broadband expansion, including access to electric cooperative easements and facilities. Note the companion SB 8 in the upper chamber.  Note further this legislation was dropped into the State’s biennial budget bill – HB 110 – via action by the House Finance Committee on April 13.

This bill quickly cleared the House Finance Committee, where Sponsor Rep. Rick Carfagna (R – Genoa Township) called this repeat measure of House Bill 13 (133rd General Assembly) a “labor of love” as approximately 1 million Ohioans lack access to reliable broadband.

The bill establishes the Ohio Residential Broadband Expansion Grant Program (R.C. 122.40 et seq.), to be housed within ODOD, providing funds to broadband providers that otherwise would not pursue expansion in certain areas of Ohio without such support. Specifically, this will provides ODOD-vetted grants to cover broadband providers’ costs of providing hard-to-reach, last-mile connectivity.

The Committee adopted an amended bill that increased funding for the proposed program ($20MM in State Fiscal Year 2021 (i.e., current budget period); $170 MM in SFY 2022; and $20MM in SFY 2023). Specifically, the Committee added two (2) amendments: (1) using $150MM of the Governor’s proposed $290MM in broadband spending to arrive at the SFY 2022 appropriation ($170MM), while keeping the SFY 2023 appropriation as originally proposed ($20MM); and (2) inserting an emergency clause.

On February 18, the legislation cleared the House (88-5 vote).

On March 23, the Senate Financial Institutions & Technology Committee heard testimony suggesting changes to the measure, including: (1) AEP Ohio requesting that electric distribution utilities be allowed to apply to the ODOD for grant funds; and (2) both the Ohio Economic Development Association and AARP requesting that governmental entities be allowed to apply for grant funds (the statewide economic development organization noted, “Ohio needs an ‘all hands on deck’ solution” to close the digital divide).

On April 27, the Senate Committee unanimously reported out the bill, which then passed unanimously via floor vote on April 28.  Amendments made by the Committee included stripping out funding for State Fiscal Year 2022 ($170MM) and SFY 2023 ($20MM), as those appropriations now are included in the state operating budget (HB 110).  Thus, funding in this bill for SFY 2021 is $20MM (to be available immediately), sourced from ODOD’s Facilities Establishment Fund rather than the state’s General Revenue Fund.  Administratively, one of the amendments creates a stand-alone fund account – the Residential Broadband Expansion Grant Program Fund – thereby enabling the fund to hold any other appropriations from the General Assembly that may be made in the future.

The measure, which includes an emergency clause, cleared the House’s concurrence vote on May 5, 2021.  The bill was signed into law by the Governor on May 17, 2021; now signed, ODOD can immediately commence the Ohio Residential Broadband Expansion Program.

HB 10 UTILITY LAWS (Leland, D.) Introduced by the House Democrats on February 4, 2021, this bill makes changes regarding electric utility service law, to allow the implementation of energy waste reduction programs, and to repeal certain provisions of H.B. 6 of the 133rd General Assembly. Sponsor Rep. David Leland (D-Columbus) seeks to repeal and refund HB 6’s subsidies as well as the decoupling charges. This measure had its first hearing on February 17 in the House Public Utilities Committee.

HB 18 ENERGY LAW REPEAL (Lanese, L.) Introduced on February 4, 2021, this bill seeks to repeal the changes made by H.B. 6 of the 133rd General Assembly to the laws governing electric service, renewable energy, and energy efficiency and the changes made to other related laws. This measure had its first hearing on February 17 in the House Public Utilities Committee.

HB 43 PUBLIC MEETINGS (Sobecki, L., Hoops, J.) Introduced on February 4, 2021, this bill seeks to permanently authorize public bodies to meet via teleconference and video conference beyond the currently July 1, 2021 sunset. The House Government Oversight Committee heard this measure for the first time on February 11.

HB 47 CHARGING STATIONS (Loychik, M.) Introduced on February 4, 2021, this bill requires the Director of ODOT to establish an electric vehicle charging station grant rebate program and to make an appropriation. Note the companion SB 32 in the upper chamber. This bill had its fourth hearing in the House Transportation & Public Safety Committee on June 22.

HB 51 VALUATION ADJUSTMENTS (Lampton, B.)  Introduced on February 3, 2021, this bill pertains to valuation adjustments for destroyed or injured property.  It passed the House unanimously on March 3, and received three hearings in the Senate Ways & Means Committee through October 2021.

On January 25, 2022, the Senate Ways & Means Committee adopted amendments to the bill to reauthorize remote hearing authority for Ohio public entities.  In so doing, the Committee Chairman Sen. Louis Blessing (R-Colerain Twp.) described the amendment as mirroring language passed during the previous session (HB 404, 133rd General Assembly: allowed state and local government entities to meet via Zoom and other communications programs, and which expired on July 1, 2021).  This bill’s authorization applies to “all publicly elected bodies” and would be effective through June 30, 2022.

Further changes to this bill made by the Senate committee included a provision to align Ohio’s tax laws with a change included in the recently passed federal infrastructure act (i.e., the taxation of entities involved in water and sewage disposal services).

On January 26, 2022 the Senate unanimously passed the bill.  Because several amendments referenced above contained emergency clauses, they will become effective immediately upon receiving the Governor’s signature.  The House concurred in Senate amendments on a vote of 88-1 on February 9, 2022.  The bill has yet to be sent to the Governor.

HB 53 CONTRACT LIMITATIONS (Hillyer, B.) Introduced on February 4, 2021, this bill seeks to shorten the period of limitations for actions upon a contract; to make changes to the borrowing statute pertaining to applicable periods of limitations; and to establish a statute of repose for a legal malpractice action. Note the companion SB 13 in the upper chamber, which was signed into law on March 16, 2021. This bill has been referred to the House Civil Justice Committee.

HB 57 ENERGY REPEAL (Skindell, M., O’Brien, M.) Introduced on February 4, 2021, this bill seeks to repeal the changes made by H.B. 6 of the 133rd General Assembly to the laws governing electric service, renewable energy, and energy efficiency. This measure had its first hearing on February 17 in the House Public Utilities Committee.

HB 58 UTILITY EARNINGS (Skindell, M., Denson, S.) Introduced on February 4, 2021, this bill pertains to the significantly excessive earnings determination for an electric distribution utility’s electric security plan. Note the similar HB 128 as well as SB 44 in the upper chamber. This House version introduced by Rep. Michael Skindell (D-Lakewood) and Rep. Sedrick Denson (D-Cincinnati) would not impact decoupling. This measure had its first hearing on February 17 in the House Public Utilities Committee.

HB 63 EMINENT DOMAIN (Cutrona, A., Stoltzfus, R.) This bill will amend the law regarding eminent domain and to declare an emergency. During sponsor testimony to the House Civil Justice Committee, Rep. Reggie Stoltzfus (R – Paris Twp.) noted the bill allows residents impacted by eminent domain to seek relief from township trustees, rather than via court procedures. This bill had its second hearing in the House Civil Justice Committee on March 2.

HB 66 PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTIONS (Hoops, J.) Introduced on February 4, 2021, this bill requires the reporting of information on, and legislative review of, property tax exemptions. This bill would require the Ohio Tax Commissioner’s biennial tax expenditure report to include data pertaining to local property tax exemption programs.

This measure passed the House on March 3 by unanimous vote.  The matter had its third hearing before the Senate Ways & Means Committee on October 19, during which an amendment was accepted to eliminate any reference to the Tax Expenditure Review Committee, which no longer exists.

HB 74 TRANSPORTATION BUDGET (Oelslager, S.) Introduced February 9, 2021, this bill is the state’s $8.3B two-year transportation budget (State Fiscal Years 2022 and 2023).

The House Finance Committee in late February and early March accepted several changes to the initially proposed transportation budget.  The provisions of the substitute bill include the following:

  • More funding for public transit.  Doubles the proposed investment for public transit to $193.7MM during the biennium
  • Removed distracted driving language.  All distracted driving provisions were remove from the as-introduced bill’s provisions; these had been a priority for Governor DeWine
  • Dedicated funding for RTPOs.  Regional Transportation Planning Organizations (RTPOs) would be allocated $2.6MM/year rural transportation planning grant programs

The House Finance Committee cleared the bill on March 3, with the entire Ohio House approving it by an 87-8 vote on March 4.

On March 24, the Senate Transportation Committee reported out the bill, and the entire Senate passed the measure by unanimous vote.  (The House concurred on an 86-8 vote.)  The bill was signed into law by Governor DeWine on March 31; there were no line-item vetoes.  The appropriations go into effect immediately; the law change provisions go into effect 90 days hence. In its final form, the bill provided the following:

  • Increases State GRF for public transit by $13.85MM each year, thus totaling $37 MM for State Fiscal Year 2022 and SFY 2023;
  • Allows for state’s driver’s license renewal on an eight-year cycle, including online renewal options;
  • Requires ODOT to reopen certain closed weigh stations as overnight parking for commercial vehicles;
  • Makes the Cleveland metro’s RTA’s rail projects eligible for ODOT’s TRAC funding process;
  • Increases capital appropriations for the Public Works Commission’s Local Public Infrastructure by $2MM; and,
  • Directs OEPA to use $8MM from Volkswagen Clean Air Act Settlement for electronic vehicle charging station grant program.

HB 91 PUBLIC FACILITY PARTNERSHIPS (Patton, T.) Introduced on February 9, 2021, this bill would authorize certain public entities to enter into public-private initiatives with a private party through a public-private agreement regarding public facilities. This bill had its third hearing on September 29 in the House Infrastructure & Rural Development Committee, intended for opponent testimony; none was heard.

HB 110 BUDGET BILL (Oelslager, S.) Introduced on February 16, 2021, this bill was the legislative vehicle for Governor Mike DeWine’s executive budget proposal. The measure was helmed by the bill’s sponsor, Rep. Scott Oelslager (R-Canton).  As widely reported, and detailed in prior months’ Bricker reports, the state budget bill gained and lost various provisions during budget negotiations.

In the late evening of Wednesday, June 30 (after having received the final, signed bill at 7pm that night), Governor DeWine signed the budget bill into law.  The final enacted version had elements of particular interest to economic developers, which are described below.


Substantive Law Changes

  • ODSA reverts back to its historic Ohio Department of Development name;
  • Transfers compliance responsibilities from the Ohio Attorney General to the Auditor of State as to recipients’ compliance with state economic development awards (new R.C. 117.55);
  • Creates within ODOD a Brownfield Remediation Program (newC. 122.6511), with project eligibility to be set via administrative rules issued by the Director; funds may cover up to 25% of a project’s total cost to remediate brownfield conditions; program must be operational and accepting application within 90 days of budget bill’s effective date (September 29, 2021), with $350MM appropriated for SFY 2022 to support the program statewide ($1M reserved for each Ohio county for one (1) year; all remaining funds awarded by ODOD on a first-come, first-served basis; authority to re-appropriate any unencumbered balance of funds in the program to SFY 2023);
  • Creates within ODOD a Building Demolition and Site Revitalization Program (newC. 122.6512), for the demolition of commercial and residential buildings and adjacent, non-brownfield properties; project eligibility to be set via administrative rules issued by the Director; funds may cover up to 25% of a project’s total cost; program must be operational and accepting application within 90 days of budget bill’s effective date (September 29, 2021), with $150MM appropriated for SFY 2022 to support the program statewide ($500,000 reserved for each Ohio county for one (1) year; all remaining funds awarded by ODOD on a first-come, first-served basis; authority to re-appropriate any unencumbered balance of funds in the program to SFY 2023);
  • Changes the ODOD’s Rural Business Growth Program (R.C. 122.151) eligibility criteria and investment requirements (e.g., referencing participating companies in the state’s border counties), bifurcating program funds as to before / after the effective date of these HB 110 changes, and requiring the new types of applications to be accepted by ODOD within 30 days of the budget bill’s effective date (on or after July 31, 2021);
  • Inserts new “megaproject” designation in the state’s Job Creation Tax Credit program (newC. 122.17(A)(11) and (D)(2)(c)), allowing tax credits for very large projects (i.e., at least $1B in capital investment or $75MM/year in new payroll, average wages at least 300% of the federal minimum wage) for up to 30 years, as well as allows JCTC recipients to include work-from-home employees in their job creation calculations (new R.C. 122.17(T));
  • Includes a new rank-ordering of Job Retention Tax Credit application priorities (newC. 122.171(C)(2)).
  • Changes elements of the state’s Opportunity Zone tax credits (R.C. 122.84) to  increase to $2MM the limits on credits awarded to individual taxpayers each budget biennium;
  • Removes production contractors from those which may claim the state’s film and theater tax credit (R.C. 122.85);
  • Drops in the provisions of proposed HB 174, which authorizes an income tax deduction for capital gains received by investors in certain Ohio-based venture capital operating companies (newC. 122.851);
  • Extends the availability of the state’s Transformational Mixed Use Tax Credit (or TMUD, at R.C. 122.09) from 2023 to 2025 and sets at $100MM the maximum annual credit allotment during those two extra years (given that no TMUD credits were issued during 2020 to 2021, this amendment shifts those years’ allotments into the extended time period);
  • Changes to JEDD law (newC. 715.72(A)(10) and (11); and (J)(2)) as to the means of creating a new or amending an existing JEDD (to add area) to require new notices, new JEDD Agreement terms, and exclusions of land from JEDDs that are in close proximity to, or subject to water / sanitary sewer service agreements by, a municipality which is not party to the JEDD Agreement.  Unless an owner signs the JEDD Petition, such land must be excluded from the JEDD District;[1]
  • Changes to TIF law by adding language to “Public Infrastructure Improvement” definition (R.C. 5709.40(A)(8)):  general use of TIF funds may now include off-street parking facilities, including those with reserved spaces (i.e., nonpublic);1
  • Cleans-up language in urban redevelopment TIF (R.C. 5709.41) to specify that exemptions commence after the effective date of the municipality’s enabling ordinance, as well as to make explicit that TIF exemptions commence upon certain value being created or on a parcel-by-parcel basis, once improvements are made (rather than an entire urban redevelopment TIF’s exemption commencing based on improvements to a singular parcel); 1
  • Inserts newC. 5713.083 to require owners of exempt property to notify their respective county auditor (on a to-be-developed OTAX form) as to the property’s ceasing to be exempt from real property taxes, with charges imposed for an owner’s failure to notify;
  • Extends by two years (to December 31, 2024) the deadline by which renewable energy operators may apply to ODOD for a Qualified Energy Project tax exemption (R.C. 5727.75);
  • Inserts “megaprojects” into the Community Reinvestment Area (CRA) program (newC. 3735.65(E)), authorizing local jurisdictions to award additional 15 years of tax exemptions to megaprojects.

 

Appropriation Items of Interest

  • Restores appropriation levels for the Ohio Rural Industrial Park Loan Program ($15MM in SFY 2022 and SFY 2023), expands eligibility beyond distressed areas by including rural areas, which are any county not within a statistical metropolitan area (MSA), as well as transfers $20MM in unencumbered funds to SFY 2022;
  • As to ODOD’s Residential Broadband Expansion Grant Program (i.e., enacted HB 2):
    • Modifies the current law’s provisions of OPERS contributions to members of the Residential Broadband Expansion Program Authority;
    • Strips out the Senate’s proposed limits on existing and future municipal broadband networks;
    • Replaces the Senate Finance Committee’s zeroed-out appropriations by providing $230MM in SFY 2022 and $20MM in SFY 2023 to ODOD for the new broadband expansion program;
  • Earmarks $1M/year to the Lucas County Land Bank for its Commercial Site Clean-up Pilot Program to demolish vacant commercial or industrial buildings in the county, with $1:$1 local match required;
  • Earmarks $250,000/year to Fulton County Land Bank to demolish vacant commercial or industrial buildings in the county;
  • Creates a Main Street Job Recovery Program ($250,000/SFY) in ODOD for business and employment opportunities among LMI and prison re-entry populations;
  • Directs ODOD to make available grants during SFY 2022 – in amounts of $10,000, $20,000, and $30,000 – for entertainment venues, bars and restaurants, and lodging industry businesses, based in-part on demonstrated losses of revenue from COVID-19, but now sources the funding from the ARPA – State Fiscal Recovery Fund;
  • Directs to ODOD to make available grants during SFY 2022 – in amounts of $10,000 – for new businesses having commenced operations after January 1, 2020, but now sources the funding from the APRA – State Fiscal Recovery Fund;
  • Appropriates $10MM in SFY 2022 in Sports Event Grant Program funds awarded under R.C. 122.12 and R.C. 122.121;
  • Creates a new Meat Processing Program Fund in ODOD, to provide up to $250,000 grants to meat processing plants for facility improvements and equipment purchases.

HB 118 WIND FARMS (Riedel, C., Stein, D.) Introduced on February 16, 2021, this bill requires inclusion of safety specifications in wind farm certificate applications, to modify wind turbine setbacks, and to permit a township referendum vote on certain wind farm and solar facility certificates. Note the companion SB 52 in the upper chamber, which was signed into law on July 12.

In effect, this bill allows local voters to veto turbine projects approved by the Ohio Power Siting Board. Specifically, the measure requires a renewable developer to submit a plan to township trustees 30 days prior to submission to the Ohio Power Siting Board; township trustees could then approve the project or trigger a referendum process, whereby the siting question would advance to the ballot at the next primary or general election (so long as at least 8% of voters in the last gubernatorial election supported the referendum).

During its first hearing on February 23, House Public Utilities Committee members expressed concern the measure sends a bad message to the business community. Rep. Laura Lanese (R-Grove City) noted the plan would establish a “very dangerous precedent…. We’re saying that with this one energy generation – or in this case two – resources we’re going to have one set of rules,” she said. “Yet with all the other sources of energy generation we’re not. From a business point of view…we’re sending this anti-business message.”

On March 23, the House Public Utilities Committee held its third hearing on the measure, with significant written and in-person testimony submitted, including Columbus Partnership CEO Alex Fischer, who noted, “This is a job killing bill.  I can’t put it any other way.”  Other opponent testimony was offered by the Ohio Chamber of Commerce, economic development organizations, and the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation.

On May 12, the House Public Utilities Committee accepted a substitute bill from the sponsors, based on industry concerns.  Under the new version of the bill, community action is moved to the beginning of the site-permitting process, with townships empowered to designate all or part of their jurisdiction as an energy development district; this latter action would be subject to referendum by the electors.  The OPSB would be prohibited from approving a project not within such an energy development district.

HB 123 COMMUNITY REINVESTMENT AREAS (Fraizer, M., Cross, J.) Introduced on February 16, 2021, this bill modifies the law governing CRA areas and the terms under which property may be exempted in such areas.

The bill streamlines the process of creating a new CRA by eliminating Ohio Department of Development (ODOD) designation and agreement sign-off responsibilities. Instead, ODOD is charged with merely designing a model CRA Agreement for commercial or industrial projects. The bill increases abatement thresholds to 75% (from current 50%) equal to which a municipality or county can make awards without school board approval. Further, the bill eliminates the requirement that municipalities that impose an income tax share that revenue with school districts when payroll from new employees is greater than $1M/year.

During sponsor testimony to the House Ways & Means Committee, Rep. Mark Fraizer (R-Newark) said the bill aims to update the Community Reinvestment Area law enacted in 1994, describing the bill’s focus as building consistency by aligning economic development tools like TIFs and CRA to default tax incentive percentages (to 75% with up to 100% available based on school board approval); reducing penalty years for relocating from 5 years to 2 years for relocating in the State; and cleaning up language and processes.

On May 26, the House voted 55-35 to approve a substitute version of the bill, which makes the following changes:

  • Allows for limited home rule townships to establish CRAs (under current law, only municipalities and counties may do so);
  • Does not require the use of ODOD model agreements, but requires CRA agreements to include ODOD’s “magic language” from its model document; and
  • Allows for municipal-school district income sharing agreements when new payroll is more than $3MM/year, tied to inflation.

The Senate Ways & Means Committee held its second hearing, to receive proponent testimony, on October 26.  Those speaking in favor of the bill included the Ohio Township Association (supporting the bill’s expansion of CRAs to limited home rule townships); the Ohio Chamber of Commerce (supporting the level of tax exemptions in a CRA that trigger local school board approval from 50% to 75%); the Ohio Real Estate Investors Association (supporting the removal of application fees); and the Ohio Municipal League.  There were no questions raised by the Committee members.

HB 128 ELECTRIC LAWS (Hoops, J., Stein, D.) This bill seeks to make changes regarding electric utility service law, to repeal the $150MM/year in nuclear payments under HB 6, and to provide refunds to retail electric customers in the state. Note the companion SB 44 in the upper chamber.

House Public Utilities Chair Rep. James Hoops (R-Napoleon) introduced this separate plan to repeal decoupling provisions and the threshold at which a utility achieves significantly excessive earnings (the so-called SEET) that should be refunded; these elements had both specifically benefited FirstEnergy.  The bill leaves intact the $20MM/year in annual solar subsidies provided under HB 6.

On March 10, the House voted 86-7 for the proposal.  (Interestingly, one of the House members voting to approve this HB 6 repeal measure was Rep. Larry Householder (R-Glenford), the former speaker who has pleaded not guilty to a racketeering charge amid the scandal.)

On March 24 the Senate voted to approve the measure; the House voted unanimously in concurrence.  The bill was signed into law by Governor DeWine on March 31, and it becomes effective 90 days hence (with revenue paid under the now-repealed HB 6 provisions to be refunded).

HB 133 TAX COMPLAINTS (Hillyer, B.) Introduced on February 17, 2021, this bill relates to commerce and property tax valuation complaints. This measure also seeks to repeal the version of R.C. 1322.24 taking effect October 9, 2021 that governs the granting of temporary permission to out-of-state mortgage lenders to originate loans in Ohio.

On March 17, this measure passed the House via unanimous vote.  The bill then was heard three times in the Senate Financial Institutions & Technology Committee during late April to early May, and was reported out as an amended measure on May 11.  That amended bill, with an emergency provision, passed the Senate unanimously on May 12.  On June 2, 2021, the Governor signed the bill into law, and it will become effective 90 days hence.

HB 143 CLEAN OHIO FUND (Hillyer, B.) Introduced on February 23, 2021, this bill seeks to make changes to the law relating to the Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund.  Note the companion SB 84 in the upper chamber.

This brownfield bill provides a dedicated funding source for the Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund (CORF). This is in response to the fact a dedicated funding source for brownfields was not included in the Governor’s introduced budget (HB 110). Sponsor Representative Hillyer (R – Uhrichsville) introduced this same legislation during the 133rd General Assembly.

HB 146 PREVAILING WAGE (Riedel, C., Manchester, S.) Introduced on February 23, 2021, this bill seeks to allow political subdivisions, special districts, and state institutions of higher education to elect to apply the Prevailing Wage Law to public improvement projects.

On June 23, this measure had its second hearing in the House Commerce & Labor Committee.

HB 155 LAND USE (Upchurch, T., Smith, M.) Introduced on February 25, 2021, this bill seeks to create the Land Reutilization Nuisance Abatement Program under R.C. Chapter 1724 (community improvement corporation statutes) to address nuisance structures by funding demolition, renovation, or remediation. Specifically, ODOD is charged with administering a $50MM grant program to county land banks for the abatement of nuisance structures on blighted parcels, including both residential and commercial properties.

On April 21, this measure had its second hearing in the House Economic & Workforce Development Committee, drawing widespread support from individuals across the state.  Rep. Monique Smith (D-Fairview Park), a chief sponsor of the bill, said the issue of blight extends across the state.  Additional supporting testimony was offered by witnesses from the City of Nelsonville, the Butler County Land Bank, the Western Reserve Land Conservancy, and the Mahoning County Land Bank.

Bricker published an article regarding the subject matter of this bill, available at the following link: https://www.bricker.com/insights-resources/publications/much-more-than-just-%E2%80%9Cdrug-houses%E2%80%9D-state-grants-to-fund-commercial-building-demolition-would-propel-county-land-banks-as-key-drivers-of-ohios-economic-development 

The bill had its fourth committee hearing on June 16.  Comments made by the committee chair, Rep. Jay Edwards (R-Nelsonville), generally were unfavorable to county land banks, as he noted the General Assembly should look at the current state of land banks and said that more guardrails, including a sheriff’s sale pre-requisite, are needed.  Given the chair’s voiced concerns with land banking in general, there is doubt this bill will be reported out of his committee.  But with the $500MM in brownfield remediation and building demolition funding provided in the state budget bill (HB 110, described above), this measure is moot at this point.

HB 157 MUNICIPAL TAXES (Jordan, K., Edwards, J.) Introduced on February 25, 2021, this bill modifies municipal income tax employer withholding rules for COVID-19-related work-from-home employees.

The bill would sunset – at the end of 2021 – a temporary rule that treated those working from a location other than their regular place of employment during the pandemic as working in the office for municipal income tax purposes. It would also require municipalities to approve employees’ requests for a refund of taxes withheld under the rule on and after January 1, 2021.

The bill had its sixth hearing on May 18, after which it was reported out along party lines for likely consideration on the floor by the entire House.  The reported measure is now a substitute version of the bill, which sunsets the current emergency changes on municipal tax payments as of December 31, 2021 and clarifies that provisions of the bill are voluntary for businesses to follow.  During the committee’s consideration, opposition testimony was offered by municipal government representatives, who noted the bill’s provisions regarding potential retroactive tax refunds could result in “very serious financial implications” for cities.

On May 26, the bill cleared the House in a party line vote; the measure now proceeds to the Senate.

HB 168 BUSINESS GRANTS (Fraizer, M., Loychik, M.) Introduced on March 2, this bill was written to provide grants to businesses, local fairs, child care providers, and veterans’ homes and to make an appropriation. Note the companion SB 109 in the upper chamber, which has been signed into law.

This bill was unanimously approved by the House on April 15, 2021, and on June 22, the Senate Finance Committee amended and reported-out this measure with a significant re-write of the entire bill.  Namely, Sen. Jay Hottinger (R-Newark) proposed an amendment to remove the original contents of the bill, replacing that language with a directive to ODJFS to certify and retire the entire amount owed by the state of its unemployment assistance loan from the federal government.  (During the COVID-19 pandemic, Ohio borrowed heavily to pay for the estimated $1.47B – $1.6B in unemployment compensation.  Without this pay-off, interest would start accruing on the federal loan in September.)  To-date, Ohio has received $2.7B State Fiscal Recovery Funds from the U.S. Treasury; another $2.7B will arrive within the year in a second and final installment.

Two days later (June 24), the bill unanimously passed the Senate after being amended on the floor in two material ways:

  1. To include SB 111’s provisions (described below) appropriating the first slug of $421.86MM in Local Fiscal Recovery Funds received by the State from the U.S. Treasury in late May (with the key inclusion of townships as so-called nonentitlement units of local government); and,
  2. To appropriate $250MM in State Fiscal Year 2022 to ODOD for a new Water and Sewer Quality grant program to counties, townships, municipal corporations, and other bodies politic in Ohio.  Within 60 days of the bill’s effective date, county engineers are to submit to ODOD a list of eligible projects, ranked in order of priority.

On June 29, Governor DeWine signed the bill into law.

HB 169 BUSINESS GRANTS (Cutrona, A., Swearingen, D.) Introduced on March 2, this bill would provide grants to bars and restaurants and the lodging industry and make an appropriation. Note the companion SB 108 in the upper chamber.

On March 24, 2021, the measure was unanimously approved by the House.  On December 7, 2021, the Senate Finance Committee loaded the legislative vehicle with $4.18B in appropriations of ARPA relief funds, reporting out a substitute version of the bill with the following:

  • $2.49B designated for the Ohio Department of Education;
    • Includes $92.2MM to establish a minimum per-pupil amount under ESSER for districts that heretofore have received little or no such funds; also includes $155.2MM in funding for nonpublic schools.
  • $687MM for the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services;
  • $529MM for the Ohio Department of Medicaid;
  • $250MM for the Ohio Department of Public Safety;
    • This funding represents Gov. Mike DeWine’s plan to provide the State’s portion of ARPA funding to first responders across the state:
      • $175MM appropriated for law enforcement agencies to fight crime, which is an eligible use of ARPA funds announced by the Biden Administration during summer 2021; and,
      • $75MM for wellness initiatives, recruitment and retainment efforts and technology;
    • $142MM for the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities;
    • $91.1MM for the Ohio Department of Health; and,
    • $4MM for the Ohio Department of Higher Education.

The bill passed the Senate on a 29-1 vote on December 8; the House voted to concur in the Senate’s rewrite of the bill on December 9.  The bill was signed into law on December 23, 2021.

Note: with these appropriations, there remains approximately $600MM from the U.S. Treasury’s first tranche (of two) of ARPA funding allocated to the State.  The Ohio Office of Budget and Management expects to receive the second tranche of Ohio’s allocated funds, $2.7B, during the first-half 2022.

HB 174 AUTHORIZE INCOME TAX DEDUCTION FOR CERTAIN CAPITAL GAINS (Cross J, Lanese L) Introduced on March 3, this bill authorizes an income tax deduction for capital gains received by investors in certain Ohio-based venture capital operating companies.

During sponsor testimony in the House Economic & Workforce Development Committee on March 24, Rep. Laura Lanese (R-Grove City) described the goal of the measure as joining 22 other states that offer tax credits to venture capital firms to encourage economic expansion. Rep. Jon Cross (R-Kenton) noted the COVID-19 pandemic has led to a movement away from the coasts.

HB 228 MUNICIPAL CORPORATION TAX (Roemer, B.) Introduced on March 23, 2021, this bill would seek to make changes related to state-administered municipal net profits taxes.  The bill, in the form amended and reported-out by the House Ways & Means Committee, allows for the following:

  • The Ohio Attorney General to charge and deduct its collection costs for any state-administered municipal net profits tax it collects.
  • Codifies into state law an OTAX online services portal designed to securely exchange information between taxpayers and the state, and requires OTAX to notify municipal corporations through the portal when taxpayers opt in or out of centralized collection.
  • Removes from state law the one piece of municipal income tax collections that was ruled unconstitutional by the Ohio Supreme Court in Athens v. McClain in 2020: an administrative filing fee.
  • Permits pass-through entities to deduct pensions and retirement benefits paid to retired partners, shareholders, or members from their municipal net profits tax liability.

On May 26, the House passed the bill on an 88-1 vote.  The Senate Ways & Means Committee reported-out an amended version of the bill on October 26, to which the House concurred, via unanimous vote; the Senate likewise passed the bill by unanimous vote on October 27.  The bill was delivered on October 29 to Governor DeWine for his signature.

HB 237 COUNTY RECORDERS (Hillyer, B.)  Introduced on March 31, this bill seeks to require counties to provide an electronic means of recording instruments and accessing them, to allow county recorders to charge a document preservation surcharge, to increase recording fees for certain instruments, and to make an appropriation.   A substitute version of the bill (which removed language that had called for recording fee deposits being made into the Ohio Housing Trust Fund) was adopted by the House State & Local Government Track Committee; that committee referred the measure to the House Finance Committee to vet an appropriation provision.

In turn, the Finance Committee held its first hearing, to take sponsor testimony, on October 26.  Rep. Brett Hillyer (R-Uhrichsville) stated this measure (first introduced as HB 797; 133rd General Assembly) would modernize county recorders’ offices.  Specifically, the bill allows property conveyances to occur electronically in all of Ohio’s 88 counties, as well as ensures electronically accessible records back to 1980.

HB 241 TAX FORECLOSURES (Patton, T.) Introduced on March 31, this bill makes changes to the law relating to tax foreclosures and county land reutilization corporations. Note the companion SB 112 in the upper chamber.  The bill has been referred to the House State & Local Government Committee.

HB 264 INCOME TAX (Smith, M., Sobecki, L.) Introduced on April 20, 2021, this bill would seek to modify the municipal income tax withholding rule for employees working at a temporary worksite.

HB 271 NATURAL GAS (Edwards, J.)  Introduced on April 22, 2021, this bill would establish a natural gas infrastructure development program and fund to help meet Ohio’s natural gas supply needs.  The measure had its first hearing in the House Energy & Natural Resources Committee on May 6.

HB 302 WIND FARMS (Skindell, M., Smith, K.)  This measure, introduced on May 11, 2021, would alter the minimum setback requirement for wind farms of five or more megawatts.

The bill had its first hearing before the House Public Utilities Committee on May 19, 2021.  During joint sponsor testimony, Rep. Kent Smith (D – Euclid) noted this measure would essentially reverse a 2014 floor amendment that extended wind turbine setbacks, reverting the setback limit for + 5MW turbines to the distance they were prior to that change.

HB 303 COMMUNITY REINVESTMENT AREAS (Swearingen, D.)  Introduced on May 12, 2021, this bill generally regards career-technical education.  The bill would require that school compensation agreements reached under commercial or industrial CRA abatements be provided on the same terms and conditions to joint vocational school districts.  Note the companion bill in the upper chamber (SB 166).

The bill had its first hearing in the House Economic & Workforce Development Committee on June 16, during which sponsor testimony by Rep. D.J. Swearingen (R-Huron).

HB 358 REVISE ETHICS LAW REPORTING REQUIREMENTS (Lanese, L., Manning, G.).  Introduced on June 22, 2021, this bill amends ethics reporting requirements.  Certain public and elected officials are required to file disclosure statements as to their sources of income, property interests, debts, and the source of gifts received for the prior year having a value over $75 (with some exceptions).  HB 358 increases this gift-disclosure-threshold to $150.  The bill was referred to the House Government Oversight Committee on June 24, 2021 and has not seen movement since.

HB 369 PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTIONS (Weinstein, C.)  Introduced on July 7, 2021, this bill seeks to enact the School Board Fairness Act, requiring school districts to approve certain residential community reinvestment area property tax exemptions.

HB 377 LOCAL FISCAL RECOVERY (Hall, T., Swearingen, D.)  Introduced on July 15, 2021, this bill seeks to amend just-enacted HB 168 to appropriate the entirety of the U.S. Treasury’s allocation of Local Fiscal Recovery Funds ($844MM) to nonentitlement units of local government (NEUs), to be distributed by Ohio OBM.

HB 389 CREATING ENERGY EFFICIENT AND DEMAND REDUCTION PORTFOLIOS (Leland, D., and Bill S.).  Introduced on August 12, 2021, the House Public Utilities Committee favorably reported a Substitute HB 389 to the full House by a vote of 17-0 on November 18, 2021 after five hearings.

As reported-out, Sub. HB 389 encourages electric distribution utilities to develop voluntary portfolios of energy savings programs to help their customers save energy.  Each electric utility may submit an application to the PUCO for approval, including a description of the program.

If approved, a utility’s portfolio costs cannot result in a rate producing a monthly charge for “residential customers” greater than $1.50 per month; residential customers are automatically opted-in and can opt-out within a limited window of time (i.e., three (3) weeks).  “Mercantile customers” (i.e., commercial or industrial users), by contrast, are automatically opted-out of any opportunity to participate in a portfolio—to participate, they must affirmatively choose to opt-in to the portfolio in writing.

Each portfolio program must be annually reviewed for cost-effectiveness and compliance with state law.

HB 399 TAX CREDIT (Smith, K., Callender, J.)  This bill was introduced on August 24, 2021 to temporarily authorize a refundable income tax credit for investing in a sound recording production company.

HB 412 TAXATION (Stoltzfus, R., Roemer, B.)  Introduced on September 8, 2021, this bill would require the online publication of mailing addresses to which certain tax complaints and appeals are filed.  The measure had its second hearing in the House Ways & Means Committee on October 26.

HB 430 PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT (Cross, J.)  Introduced on September 21, 2021, this bill enacts new R.C. 713.28 related to property development adjacent to natural gas transmission pipelines.  This measure had its second hearing in the House Energy & Natural Resources Committee on December 8.

HB 434 NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY (Stein, D.)  This bill was introduced on September 29, 2021 to establish the Ohio Nuclear Development Authority.  This measure had its second hearing in the House Energy & Natural Resources Committee on December 8.

HB 436 PORT AUTHORITIES (Jordan, K., Carfagna, R.)  Introduced on September 28, 2021, this bill seeks to narrow the purposes for which a pre-1982 port authority (i.e., a port formed under R.C. 4582.01 to R.C. 4582.20) may issue revenue bonds beyond its limit of bonded indebtedness, as well as to exempt from sales/use taxes the sale of TPP or services used in fulfilling a public contract with a port authority.  As to the latter change, the bill provides that the sales and use tax will not be applied on the sales of tangible personal property or services to a person under contract with a port authority.

In hearings before the House Ways & Means Committee (two such hearings through November 9), sponsor Rep. Kris Jordan (R-Ostrander) said the bill provides clarification regarding the scope of the “building and construction materials and services” exemption from the state sales and use tax (R.C. 5739.02(B)(13)); the Ohio Chamber testified in support of the measure.

HB 450 SOLAR PROJECTS (Baldridge, B., Lanese, L.)  Introduced on October 12, 2021, this bill allows for the development of community solar projects. Specifically, the bill permits community solar in the territories of the electric distribution utilities (EDUs).  (To date, community solar has not been available in EDU territories due to the inability for customers to participate in aggregate or virtual net metering; an EDU cannot control a community solar project but its affiliate may control the facility.)

This bill authorizes the PUCO to certify up to 2,000 MW of community solar projects, with additional authorization to certify another 1,000 MW of community solar project constructed exclusively on “distressed sites” (with a majority of such projects to be located in the Appalachian region).

A “community solar project” is one that meets all the following:

  • It has at least three subscribers, with no subscriber holding more than a 40% proportional interest in the output of the facility;
  • Has a nameplate capacity ≤ 10 MW (unless the project is located on a “distressed site,” it which case it may have a nameplate capacity of up to 45 MW); and,
  • It is located on one or more adjacent or contiguous parcels of land and is not located within 1 mile of solar facilities under the control of the same entity.

The bill defines “distressed site” as contiguous parcels whereby the majority of acreage is: (i) a brownfield under R.C. 122.65; (ii) within NMTC area; or (iii) a closed solid waste facility.  Community solar projects located on distressed sites may receive grant funds from ODOD under its new brownfield remediation program (new R.C. 122.6511) for construction and remediation.

The measure had its second hearing on November 10 in the House Public Utilities Committee.

HB 470 MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL HOUSING (Hillyer, B.)  Introduced on October 27, 2021, this bill seeks to authorize the Ohio community investor credit for qualifying developers of multi-family residential housing projects.  This measure had its first hearing in the House Ways & Means Committee on November 16.

HB 501 TOWNSHIP LAWS (Hall, T.)  Introduced on December 7, 2021, this bill seeks to make various township law changes, specifically with respect to Township utilization of Tax Increment Financing (TIF) arrangements.  While Townships may presently utilize TIF mechanisms to fund public infrastructure improvements, the bill would further allow Townships to engage in a “municipal redevelopment TIF” (R.C. 5709.41).  Authorizing Townships to utilize the “municipal redevelopment TIF” process, would allow Township usage of payments in lieu of taxes to support any project described in a TIF resolution.  Sponsor Rep. Thomas Hall (R-Middletown) noted the TIF language was “sought by large townships but would apply to all” and the bill “is a work in progress.”

The measure had its first hearing on January 18, 2022 in the House Ways & Means Committee. 

HB 531 COUNTY PROSECUTOR (Ghanbari, H.)  Introduced on January 12, 2022 and subsequently referred to the Committee on Civil Justice, this bill allows a county prosecutor to provide legal services to a metropolitan planning organization, regional transportation planning organization, or regional council of governments.  County prosecutors could recuperate costs of service via prior, agreed to legal fees paid by contracting entities, though such agreements are not required.

The Committee held its first hearing on the measure on February 1, 2022 and received proponent testimony from the Toledo Metropolitan Area Council of Governments, the County Commissioners Association of Ohio, and the Ohio Prosecuting Attorneys Association at a second hearing on February 8, 2022. 

HB 560 (Hoops, J. and Pavliga G.)  Introduced on February 7, 2022, this bill would authorize a nonrefundable tax credit for the construction or rehabilitation of certain affordable rental housing units.  The bill would authorize the Director of the Ohio Housing Finance Agency to reserve a tax credit for the owners of a qualified, low-income building in addition to the federal low-income tax credit, so long as doing so would not exceed further, defined limitations.  The measure would expire after January 1, 2028.

HB 566 (Blackshear, W. and White, A.)  Introduced on February 9, 2022, this bill would require owners of vacant property to file contact information with the county auditor. 

 

[1] The changes to JEDD and TIF law were the subject of a Bricker-authored article published during the budget bill’s consideration, available at the following link: https://www.bricker.com/resource-center/develop-ohio/publications/ohio-senate-committee-chefs-baking-economic-development-morsels-into-their-version-of-the-state-budget-bill

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Tracked Senate Bills – February 2022 https://ohioeda.com/tracked-senate-bills-february-2022/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 18:50:05 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14201

Jeffry Harris
Bricker & Eckler LLP

 

Federal News:

2022 may be the tipping point in sales of electric vehicles:  Market analysts are predicting 2022 may be the year in which sales of cars powered solely by batteries tip into the mainstream.  Data reported for 2021 show such vehicle sales surged in the United States, Europe and China; sales of fossil fuel vehicles were stagnant.

One compelling data point is that electric vehicles accounted for only 2 ½ percent of new vehicle sales in 2019, but were nearly 9 percent of all new cars sold worldwide in 2021.  It could be that 2022 is the year when the internal combustion engine truly began to slide toward obsolescence.

The auto industry is on track to invest $500B during the next five years to transition their assembly plant fleets to electric vehicles.

“It’s one of the biggest industrial transformations probably in the history of capitalism,” Scott Keogh, chief executive of Volkswagen Group of America, said in an interview.

Note that manufacturers of mufflers, fuel injection systems and other parts could go out of business. Nearly three million Americans make, sell and service cars and auto parts; electric cars require fewer workers because the cars have fewer components.

This news is important because most analysts figured that electric vehicles wouldn’t take off until they became as inexpensive to buy as gasoline models, thought to be several years away.  But the transition is occurring on a more rapid timetable than initially thought.

 

134TH GENERAL ASSEMBLY – PROPOSED & ENACTED LEGISLATION
(Changes from last month are noted in BOLD):

SENATE RESOLUTIONS:

SJR 2 WATER QUALITY BONDS (Gavarone, T., Yuko, K.)  This Resolution proposes to enact Section 2t of Article VIII of the Ohio Constitution to permit the issuance of general obligation bonds to fund clean water improvements.

 

SENATE BILLS:

SB 8 BROADBAND SERVICES (McColley, R.) Introduced on January 21, 2021, this bill addresses broadband expansion, including access to electric cooperative easements and facilities, and to make an appropriation. Note the companion HB 2 in the lower chamber, which has been signed into law by Governor DeWine.

This bill is a refresh of House Bill 13 (133rd General Assembly), which failed in the final stretch to enactment during the lame duck last session. Sponsor Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon) notes this version represents a negotiated substitute bill that had been poised for adoption last December.

This bill seeks to establish an Ohio Residential Broadband Expansion Program (R.C. 122.40 et seq.) to induce internet providers to construct last-mile infrastructure to underserved areas, particularly in rural Ohio. Changes since the last General Assembly’s version include moving the program to ODOD, with the agency reviewing grant applications for the proposed Broadband Expansion Program Authority.

This Senate vehicle appropriates $20MM to the ODOD program in state fiscal year 2022.

After three hearings before the Senate Energy & Public Utilities Committee during late January and February, the Senate unanimously adopted the measure on February 10; it now moves to the House, where is has been referred to the House Finance Committee.

SB 10 ELECTRIC RATES (Romanchuk, M.). This bill seeks to change to two (2) FirstEnergy-friendly rate provisions: (a) repealing HB 6’s so-called “decoupling mechanism” that allowed FirstEnergy to lock its annual guaranteed revenue at 2018 levels – or $978MM/year; and (b) repealing the prior state budget bill’s modification to the significantly excessive earnings test (or SEET) determination as to whether FirstEnergy utilities obtained significantly excessive earnings that must be refunded (the budget bill had allowed FirstEnergy to combine figures across its three companies, offsetting gains at Ohio Edison with those from less profitable companies under its umbrella). Note the companion HB 128 in the lower chamber. This legislation leaves unchanged HB 6’s nuclear subsidies for the FirstEnergy power plants.

During February, the Senate Energy & Public Utilities Committee held three hearings, with the Senate unanimously passing the bill on February 17. The bill has been referred to the House Public Utilities Committee.

SB 13 CONTRACT LIMITATIONS (Lang, G.). This bill shortens the period of limitations for actions upon a contract; makes changes to the borrowing statute pertaining to applicable periods of limitations; and establish a statute of repose for a legal malpractice actions. Note the companion HB 53 in the lower chamber. The bill was heard and reported out by the Senate Judiciary Committee in early February, passed the Senate by unanimous vote on February 3, and passed the House by unanimous vote on February 24. The measure was signed into law by Governor DeWine on March 16 and takes effect 90 days hence.

SB 19 TAX EXEMPTION (Schaffer, T.) Introduced on January 26, this bill establishes a property tax exemption for certain property used for wetland mitigation projects. Specifically, this legislation codifies into law a current practice for property used in wetland mitigation projects used by nonprofit organizations. Bill sponsor, Sen. Tim Schaffer (R-Lancaster), noted, “If counties decide that they can charge property taxes on these wetlands, we would drastically hurt development that would normally occur in our districts,”

After the Senate Ways & Means Committee quickly reported out the measure, the Senate unanimously passed the bill on February 24.

The House passed the measure on June 28 (by a 59-36 vote), with amendments to reflect minor changes in this tax exemption’s application filing process.  Importantly, during its passage, the bill became an omnibus tax policy update, with changes including an imposition of limits on tax revenue options available to the Toledo Area Regional Transit Authority (TARTA).  Relevant to economic developers, the measure also included language from HB 51’s proposed process by which county auditors could initiate themselves (i.e., without need for property owner’s application) any changes to taxable value arising from destroyed / damaged property.

On November 10, the Senate declined to accept the House-passed version; in turn, on November 18, the House formally insisted the Senate accept the lower chamber’s amendments.  On February 8, 2022 conferees were named to reconcile differences between the two versions.

SB 32 CHARGING STATIONS (Rulli, M.) This bill would require the Director of ODOT to establish an electric vehicle charging station grant rebate program and to make an appropriation. Note the companion HB 47 in the lower chamber. This measure had its first hearing before the Senate Transportation Committee on February 17.

SB 44 ENERGY LAW (Rulli, M., Cirino, J.) Introduced on February 2, 2021, this bill seeks to repeal the nuclear resource credit payment provisions, and amend, and rename as solar resource, the renewable resource credit payment provisions of H.B. 6 of the 133rd General Assembly. Note the companion SB 128 in the lower chamber.

Sponsors Sen. Jerry Cirino (R-Kirtland) and Sen. Michael Rulli (R-Salem) note their proposal takes a more targeted approach to addressing the ongoing uncertainty over the future of last session’s HB 6. Specifically, this bill repeals the nuclear subsidies program portion of HB 6 while maintaining previous bill’s $20MM in annual solar subsidies. All other aspects of HB6 would remain in place. By design, Sen. Cirino noted, “It doesn’t open up the whole of House Bill 6 for negotiation”; the Senator represents a district in which is located one of the subject nuclear energy plants.

This measure was approved unanimously by the Senate on March 2. It was referred to the House on March 9.

SB 45 TAX INDUCEMENTS (Peterson, B., Kunze, S.) Introduced on February 2, 2021, this bill seeks to enhance state and local tax inducements for businesses making substantial fixed asset and employment investments and their suppliers. The measure had its third hearing before the Senate Ways & Means Committee on February 23.

SB 52 WIND FARMS (Reineke, B., McColley, R.) Introduced February 9, 2021, this bill requires inclusion of safety specifications in wind farm certificate applications, modifies wind turbine setbacks, and permits a township referendum vote on certain wind farm and solar facility certificates. Note the companion HB 118 in the lower chamber.

This bill, allowing for local prohibitions on wind turbine and solar projects, gained and lost various provisions during its journey to enactment.  (Those fits and starts appear in prior months’ Bricker reports.)

Governor DeWine signed the bill into law on July 12; it takes effect 90 days hence.  The final enacted version had the following key elements:

  • A renewable energy developer must hold a public meeting in the proposed impacted community within six months prior to submitting a project application to the Ohio Power Siting Board.  During the public hearing, the developer must provide county commissioners with project documentation, including maximum nameplate capacity and its proposed boundaries.  Thereafter, county commissioners would have a 90-day window in which to: (i) do nothing (i.e., de facto approval); (ii) pass a resolution banning the project outright; or (iii) pass a resolution limiting the geographic area of the project.
  • County commissioners are authorized to pass a resolution prior to any potential project to designate a restricted area in which any such construction is prohibited.  Further, county commissioners must provide public notice to taxing entities in effected areas of a pending vote to designate a restricted area.
  • Creates two (2) new ad-hoc voting seats on the Ohio Power Siting Board when voting on such projects (the new seats would be occupied, on a case-by-case basis, by a county commissioner and township trustee from areas within the footprint of the project being voted on).  These ad hoc members are voting members, and must be named within 30 days after receiving notice of an application.  The ad hoc OPSB members must be either a resident or another elected official from the respective political subdivision.  These ad hoc members are prohibited from voting on their own commissioners / trustees boards as to local legislation to intervene on the state proceeding.  These ad hoc members may engage in ex parte communications with any party in the case.
  • The bill applies its provisions to “material amendments” to an existing facility, which is defined as changes to a facility’s generation type, increased nameplate capacity, modified boundaries in most cases, or increased number or height of wind turbines.
  • Applies current law to economically significant or large wind farms that have incomplete applications pending with the Siting Board for up to 30 days after this bill’s effective date.

A Bricker-authored article was published as this bill was being delivered to Governor DeWine for his signature, available at the following link: https://www.bricker.com/resource-center/solar/publications/ohio-general-assembly-passes-sb-52-changes-to-wind-and-solar-siting-requirements

SB 57 EXEMPT CERTAIN HOUSING FROM PROPERTY TAXATION (Hackett R., Antonio N.) Introduced on February 9, 2021, this bill modifies the law regarding property tax exemptions and procedures and to authorize COVID-19-related property tax valuation complaints.

Of particular note to economic developers, the bill includes language regarding TIF annual service payments in lieu of taxes (i.e., PILOTs), namely: a change to R.C. 5709.91 to render minimum service payments by developers as covenants running with the land (and therefore enforceable against subsequent owners), to be recorded with the county recorder, in those TIF projects in which developers agree to make minimum PILOTs under the terms of their development agreements.

The Senate unanimously passed the measure on February 24, 2021.  And on March 25, following changes to the bill in the House the House likewise unanimously passed the bill and sent it back to the Senate.  On April 21, the Senate unanimously concurred with the House’s changes to the measure, and Governor DeWine signed the measure into law on April 27, 2021 (to be effective 90 days hence).

SB 61 PLANNED COMMUNITIES (Blessing, L., Antonio, N.) Introduced on February 17, 2021, this bill concerns condominiums and planned community properties and seeks to make changes to the New Community Law (R.C. Chapter 349).

This measure had its fourth hearing on October 19 in the Senate Local Government & Elections Committee, during which two amendments were accepted: (i) removing proposed changes to the New Community Authority law (R.C. Chapter 349) (already enacted in the state operating budget (HB 110)); and (ii) enabling condo boards and HOAs to more easily delete – as void under the law – restrictive covenants based on race, color, national origin, sex, religion, or familial status.  The bill also allows the use of solar energy collection devices, such as solar panels, within HOAs and planned communities.

On January 26, 2022 the Senate passed the bill on a vote of 32 to 1.  The bill was introduced in the House on February 1, 2022 and has yet to be referred. 

SB 83 BROWNFIELD SITES (Williams, S., Rulli, M.) Introduced on February 23, 2021, this bill seeks to require OEPA to conduct a study to determine where brownfield sites are located in Ohio and to make an appropriation.  Specifically, the measure appropriates $150,000 from State GRF for an OEPA study of brownfield sites, with support from universities, to fill in the gaps in the current inventory program (which relies on voluntary reporting).  The bill’s deadline for OEPA would be January 1, 2023.

The sponsors estimated there are approximately 9,000 such brownfield sites in existence in Ohio, but there is no single complete listing.

On May 19, 2021, the bill was passed unanimously by the Senate.

The bill had its fifth hearing in the House Agriculture & Conservation Committee on December 7, 2021, during which the Committee reported out a revised version of the bill.  The bill was changed in direct response to Ohio EPA’s testimony to the Committee regarding a lawsuit in the early 2000s, when the agency was sued regarding its “master sites list” at the time.  The suit arose from complaints as to the list’s effect on property values, and a court found OEPA did not have the authority to keep such a list (thereby explaining the current voluntary nature of the state’s brownfields listing).

As such, the Committee’s reported-out version of the bill appropriates $150,000 to fund Phase I environmental assessments, which run between $5,000 – $8,000/site, which, upon completion, such assessments would provide brownfield sites’ entry into Ohio EPA’s Voluntary Action Program.  This level of funding is estimated to provide up to 28 such site assessments.

SB 84 CLEAN OHIO FUND (Williams, S., Rulli, M.) Introduced on February 23, 2021, this bill seeks to make changes to the law relating to the Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund.  Note the companion HB 143 in the lower chamber.

This measure had its first hearing on March 16 in the Senate Agriculture & Natural Resources Committee, during which joint sponsor testimony from Sen. Michael Rulli (R-Salem) and Sen. Sandra Williams (D-Cleveland).  Outlining their bill, the sponsors noted this measure would re-fund the Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund for cleanup of the sites identified under SB 83 (above), by directing excess liquor profits received from JobsOhio and pledging tem for Clean Ohio bonds.  Sponsors noted during the period 2002 through 2013, CORF provided $400MM in grant assistance for brownfield site redevelopment.

Note the General Assembly addressed this matter via the Brownfield Remediation Program ($350MM) inserted into the state’s biennial budget, HB 110 (described above), signed into law on June 30, 2021.

SB 97 MUNICIPAL TAXES (Roegner, K.) Introduced on February 25, 2021, this bill seeks to modify municipal income tax employer withholding rules for COVID-19-related work-from-home employees.  Note the similar bill in the lower chamber (HB 157).  This bill had its first hearing in the Senate Ways & Means Committee on May 12.

SB 98 TAX EXEMPTION (Antani, N.) Introduced on February 24, 2021, this measure seeks to exempt from sales and use tax things used primarily to move completed manufactured products or general merchandise, such as forklifts.  The bill had its first hearing in the Senate Ways & Means Committee on September 21, with sponsor testimony heard from Sen. Antani (R – Miamisburg).

SB 108 BUSINESS GRANTS (Huffman, S., Romanchuk, M.) Introduced on March 2, 2021, this bill would provide $100MM in grants to bars and restaurants and $25MM to the lodging industry and make such appropriations. Note the companion HB 169 in the lower chamber.

On March 17, the Senate unanimously passed this spending proposal; the House Economic & Workforce Committee referred the bill in late April to the House Finance Committee, the latter of which reported out the measure on May 5.  Later that same day, the House passed the bill on a 93-1 vote (the Senate concurred unanimously), and the bill was signed into law by the Governor on May 17, 2021.

SB 109 GRANT PROGRAM (Manning, N., Rulli, M.) Introduced on March 2, 2021, this bill would provide $300MM in grants to small businesses, child care providers, and indoor entertainment venues and make such appropriations. Note the companion HB 168 in the lower chamber, which was signed into law as a completely rewritten measure. On March 16, at its second hearing, this bill was reported out of the Senate Finance Committee and on March 17, the Senate unanimously passed this spending proposal; the House Economic & Workforce Committee referred the bill in late April to the House Finance Committee.  In turn, the House Finance Committee changed the bill: for entertainment venue ($20MM/SFY 2021) and new business ($10MM/SFY 2021) grant programs administered by ODOD, the source of funding replaced the General Revenue Fund with federal the State’s Coronavirus Relief Fund.

The bill includes $150MM to the ODOD to provide grants to eligible small businesses which did not receive COVID-19 relief funding in 2020.

The Committee reported out the measure on May 5.  Later that same day, the House passed the bill on a 89-2 vote (the Senate concurred unanimously), and the bill was signed into law by the Governor on May 17, 2021.

SB 111 LOCAL FISCAL RECOVERY (Blessing, L., Brenner, A.)  Introduced on March 2, 2021, this bill originally sought to provide funding to schools in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.  In its original form, the bill passed the Senate by unanimous vote on March 24.  Those provisions were enacted into law via its companion HB 170.

On June 22, the House Finance Committee used this measure as the vehicle to appropriate $422MM of ARPA Local Fiscal Recovery Funds, representing the first slug received in late May by the State from the U.S. Treasury.  The appropriations are to distribute federal stimulus to nonentitlement units of local government (NEUs), or those non-metro cities with less than 50,000 population which did not receive Local Fiscal Recovery Funds directly from the U.S. Treasury (compare: counties and metro cities).

Importantly, the Committee included townships as NEUs in its appropriations of Local Fiscal Recovery Funds.

The Local Fiscal Recovery Funds will be distributed via Ohio OBM to non-metro cities, incorporated villages and townships based on population.

(In late May, the U.S Treasury instructed those states with “minor civil divisions,” or townships in Ohio’s instance, to undertake a facts-and-circumstances test to determine whether such entities have the legal and operational capacity to stand as NEUs in accepting Local Fiscal Recovery Fund allocations and provide a broad enough range of services that would constitute eligible uses of such funds.   Bricker had expected the DeWine Administration, through the Ohio OBM, to make such a factual determination; with this measure, the Ohio General Assembly legislatively determined that townships are eligible to receive ARPA stimulus funding.)

The Committee accepted the re-written measure, with the House passing the bill on June 24 by a 60-34 vote (with a last-minute floor amendment to prohibit public and private entities from requiring COVID-19 vaccinations).  Note the provisions of this rewritten measure were inserted into HB 168, which has been signed into law.

SB 112 TAX FORECLOSURES (Dolan, M.) Introduced on March 2, 2021, this bill seeks to make changes to the law relating to tax foreclosures and county land reutilization corporations. This measure is a re-introduction of the county land bank law changes proposed in August 2020 under companion bills in the previous Ohio General Assembly (HB 755 and SB 356).

Note the companion HB 241 in the lower chamber.

As was the case with the previously introduced bills, SB 112 seeks to make large-scale changes to county land banking law (R.C. Chapter 5722) and the law relating to tax foreclosures (R.C. Chapter 323). This measure was written in coordination with the Cuyahoga County Land Bank and other land bank leaders in Ohio.

During sponsor testimony on March 16 in the Senate Local Government & Elections Committee, Sen. Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) described his bill as a modernization of land banking in Ohio.  Land banking statutes in Ohio were last updated in 2015 by removing population requirements first put in place in 2009, thus making all counties eligible to form county land banks.  At present, 59 counties have established land banks across Ohio.

The measure had its third hearing on October 19, during which an amendment was accepted, making the following changes to the bill: (i) requires a county land bank’s annual report to include DTAC collection information and the county land bank’s financial position; (ii) clarifies “nonproductive land” must only be offered for sale once; (iii) changes the timeframe for appeals under the expedited tax foreclosure process from 14 to 30 days; (iv) reinstates existing law provision requiring property transfer fees to be paid to the county recorder for the transfer and recording of a deed; and (v) clarifies both “nonproductive” and “abandoned lands” that are foreclosed will forfeit to the state if not sold upon first sale.

In a fourth hearing on January 26, 2022, the Committee accepted two amendments and unanimously reported a substitute version of the bill to the full Senate.  The first amendment was a technical amendment offered by the Legislative Service Commission, while the second removed a provision which would have exempted county land banks from being considered a “public authority” pursuant to R.C. Chapter 4115 (i.e., wages and hours on public works). 

The Senate passed the measure unanimously on February 9, 2022. 

SB 144 CONSUMER PROTECTIONS (Rulli, M., Williams, S.)  Introduced on March 23, this bill would enact the Consumer Protection Call Center Act which would requrie notices by employers relocating a call center to a foreign country and would disqualify those same employers, upon their reolcation, from receiving state grants, loans, tax credits and other incentives for five years.  The Senate Finance Committee held its first hearing on the measure on Sept. 14, during which its sponsor, Sen. Michael Rulli (R-Salem), stated it is aimed at discouraging firms from relocating call center jobs overseas.

The Committee held its second hearing on the measure on February 8, 2022 during which members of the Communications Workers of America (CWA) spoke in favor of the bill.

SB 152 TASK FORCE ESTABLISHMENT (Hoagland, F.)  Introduced on April 6, 2021, this bill would establish the Fraud, Waste, and Abuse Task Force in the office of the Attorney General.  This 10-person office would investigate instances of fraud by entities applying for public funds, including grants.

The bill had its first hearing in the Senate Finance Committee on November 9, during which sponsor Sen. Frank Hoagland (R-Mingo Junction) stated his intention that the task force investigate cases of fraud or abuse of public funds obtained from Ohio by private individuals or entities (e.g., economic development programs).  The Senator noted, “Any person would be able to file a complaint with the Task Force alleging any of the potential offenses.”  The Senator further acknowledged other entities currently provide such oversight, including the Ohio Ethics Commission Track, Joint Legislative Ethics Committee Track and Inspector General.

SB 166 VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS-COMMUNITY REINVESTMENT AREAS (Reineke, W.)  Introduced on April 21, 2021, this bill generally regards career-technical education.  The bill would require that school compensation agreements reached under commercial or industrial CRA abatements be provided on the same terms and conditions to joint vocational school districts.  Note the companion bill in the lower chamber (HB 303).

This measure unanimously passed the Senate on June 16, 2021.  The bill had three hearings in the House Economic & Workforce Development Committee (October – November), and was passed by the House, on an emergency basis and according to an 88-1 vote, on December 9.  In turn, the Senate concurred on December 15 with the House’s amendments, and the measure was signed into law on December 22, 2021.

SB 172 MUNICIPAL CORPORATION (Schaffer, T.)  Introduced on May 5, 2021, this bill would require municipal corporations with more than $100 million in annual income tax collections to provide a tax credit to nonresident taxpayers.

SB 192 PROPERTY TAX (Williams, S.)  Introduced on June 1, 2021, this bill would seek to protect legacy homeowners from spikes in their property taxes as surrounding properties redevelop.  Specifically, the bill would reduce property taxes on owner-occupied homes to the extent the taxes increase by more than 10% per year.

The bill had its first hearing in the Senate Ways & Means Committee on December 14 for sponsor testimony.  Sen. Sandra Williams (D-Cleveland) stated the measure is targeted at long-term homeowners, or those who has lived in their homes for at least 10 years.  The bill would address property tax loads increasing “between 100- 300%” in some neighborhoods experiencing redevelopment.  The Senator added that she has not seen any initiatives from cities or counties to address the issue.

SB 212 FORECLOSURES (Hackett, B.)  Introduced on July 27, 2021, this bill seeks to make procedural changes to real property foreclosures under R.C. Chapter 2329 (i.e., judicial sales, sheriffs’ sales, etc.).  This bill had its first hearing in the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 14, during which sponsor testimony was provided by Sen. Bob Hackett (R-London).

SB 225 TAX CREDITS (Schuring, K.)  Introduced on September 8, 2021, this bill would temporarily modify the historic rehabilitation and the opportunity zone investment tax credits.  Sponsor Sen. Kirk Schuring (R-Canton) has stated developers advised him the state could do more to improve the HPTC’s use and that the Opportunity Zone Tax Credit has been underutilized because of delays in regulations at the federal level.

Changes would apply for State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2022 and SFY 2023 as follows:

  • Historic Preservation Tax Credit (HPTC) program:
    • Increase the HPTC aggregate cap from $60MM/year to $120MM/year;
    • Increase each project cap from $5MM to $10MM;
    • Increase tax credit thresholds for municipalities < 71,000 population from 25% to 35%.
    • Projects having been approved during SFY 2021 can convert their credit to capture these enhancements, so long as the project did not yet commence
  • Ohio Opportunity Zone Tax Credit program:
    • Increase the amount of funds available from $50MM to $100MM.

In hearings before the Senate Finance Committee (four such hearings through December 7), the sponsor suggested several amendments to the bill to be proposed at an upcoming Committee hearing:

  • Allow developers who were approved by the Department of Development for historic rehabilitation tax credits in Fiscal Year 2021 to reapply for enhanced credits if their projects have not yet gone to construction;
  • Align the state preservation tax credit guidelines with those for the federal preservation tax credit;
  • Require the ODOD when reviewing a proposed project involving a historic theater to consider how the effort would affect gross receipts and economic conditions in the vicinity;
  • Establish an additional time period for Opportunity Zone Tax Credit applications, and allow holders of OZ credits to transfer those credits; and, unrelatedly,
  • Revise a HB 110 (state operating budget) provision allowing political subdivisions to use TIF or DRD PILOTs for off-street parking projects (Sen. Schuring: “Other projects should qualify.”)

At a fifth hearing before the Senate Finance Committee on January 25, 2022, the Committee accepted the first four bulleted items outlined above as amendments from the sponsor.

At a final hearing on February 8, 2022 the Committee accepted an amendment offered by the sponsor and unanimously reported the bill to the full Senate.  The sponsor’s amendment would allow local legislative authorities to reserve some parking spots for private use in parking garages built with TIF.  Sponsor stressed that while this ability was already codified in the biennial budget bill, that measure only applied to projects “going forward.”  This measure would apply to “any parking garage built inside a TIF” past, present, or future.    

SB 260  POLITICAL SUBDIVISION (Lang, G.)  Introduced on November 9, 2021, this bill seeks to expand political subdivision joint purchasing authority to expressly include purchases for construction services.

SB 291 (Hoagland, F.)  Introduced on February 8, 2022, this bill would establish a veteran-owned business enterprise certification program and allow duly certified veteran-owned and women-owned business enterprises to compete for purchases set aside by state agencies.

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Community & Economic Development Director – City of Moline, Illinois https://ohioeda.com/community-economic-development-director-city-of-moline-illinois/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 16:47:44 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14196

Nestled between the banks of the Mississippi and Rock rivers in the heart of the Midwest, the City of Moline invites you to Take Time to Support, Take Time to Live, and Take Time to Discover. The ninth-largest city in Illinois outside of the Chicago Metropolitan Area is home to nearly 43,000 people and was recently named among the most affordable places to live in the country.

Under the direction of the City Administrator, the Community and Economic Development Director oversees and coordinates all land use planning and zoning, zoning enforcement, economic development, community development, and grant application efforts in support of the community’s and organization’s policies, objectives, and goals. With 13 authorized positions and an annual budget of about $9.9 million, the Community and Economic Development Department strives to create a healthy and strong community with beautiful neighborhoods and a thriving economy.

The City of Moline seeks a collaborative and charismatic servant-leader ready to guide the community into its next era of growth and quality development. This position requires a master’s degree from an accredited college or university and seven years of progressively responsible supervisory experience in public administration, business administration, economic development, urban planning or a related field, and/or any equivalent combination of training and experience that provides the required knowledge, skills, and abilities. The person selected for this position should have at least 12 years of experience, and hold certification from the American Institute of Certified Planners as a Certified Economic Developer or as an Economic Development Finance Professional.

The City of Moline is offering an annual salary range of $110,455 to $154,637, dependent upon qualifications and experience.

Please apply online: http://www.governmentresource.com/executive-recruitment/open-recruitments/moline-il-community-economic-development-director

For more information on this position contact:
Marsha Reed, Senior Vice President
MarshaReed@GovernmentResource.com
806-789-9641

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Economic Development Consultant – Request for Proposal – City of North College Hill https://ohioeda.com/economic-development-consultant-request-for-proposal-city-of-north-college-hill/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 20:00:04 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14186

Economic Development Consultant
Request for Proposal

Deadline for submission:
Friday, February 25, 2022

Deliver proposals to:
City of North College Hill
Attn: City Administrator
1500 W. Galbraith Rd.
Cincinnati, OH 45231

(513) 521-7413

 

Questions concerning the following proposal should be sent by email to Nicole Miller. Her email address is nmiller@northcollegehill.org

 

Purpose
The City of North College Hill is seeking proposals from individuals or firms that are experienced and knowledgeable in preparing and implementing economic development plans for small cities.

Background
The City of North College Hill was first incorporated as a village in 1916, then by virtue of its growth became a city in 1941. It reached its highest population in the 1960’s when the population exceeded 12,000. Since that time, the population had decreased to a low of about 9,300 in 2010. During the last census, however, North College Hill’s population increased to 9,600, for about a 3% growth. Geographically, the City of North College Hill is situated in the middle of Hamilton County. Ronald Reagan Highway borders the city to the north, offering easy access to I-71, I-74, and I-75. Additionally, Hamilton Ave, the main street which is the east/west dividing line for the city, is also one of the most popular routes on the Metro Bus system.

Statement of Need
The purpose of this Request for Proposals is to identify a consultant that can assist the City of North College Hill in evaluating our current economic landscape, identifying our strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, developing recommendations and solutions, then implementing them. In this capacity, the consultant would be working closely with the City Administrator, the North College Hill Chamber of Commerce, and the North College Hill Community Improvement Corporation.  The objective would be to create a three to five year plan that can be passed by council as policy, and implemented by administration.

Proposals
All proposals should contain the following:
1. A statement of qualifications relevant to need expressed in the RFP.
2. A resume for each person that is part of the proposed team.
3. Proposed scope of services, proposed methodology, and a proposed timeline for achieving the objectives.
4. A list of prior projects similar to this one.
5. Three references.
6. Estimated cost.
The completed package will contain the original proposal with three additional copies. The envelope should be sealed and delivered to: The City of North College Hill, Attn: Nicole Miller, 1500 W. Galbraith Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45231

Additional Requirements
The consultant may be required to attend evening meetings to provide updates to committees or to the City Council. The consultant would report directly to the City Administrator, and monthly reports will be required.

 

 

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Manager of Economic Development – Montrose Group, LLC – Columbus, Ohio https://ohioeda.com/manager-of-economic-development-montrose-group-llc-columbus-ohio/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 19:04:16 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14180

Montrose Group, LLC is a Columbus, Ohio based consulting firm that provides corporate site location, economic development planning and lobbying services to clients nationally.  Dave Robinson is the Founder and Principal of Montrose Group, Nate Green is a partner in the firm and serves as Managing Director of Economic Development, Jamie Beier Grant serves as Director of Economic Development Planning and Tim Biggam serves as the Director of Government Relations.  Montrose Group is seeking a Manager of Economic Development.  The Montrose Group’s Manager of Economic Development will be a full-time employee that requires at minimum a bachelor’s degree and 3 years of economic development experience that includes a knowledge of local, state and federal economic development programs, strong inter-personal communication skills, is a problem solver and has strong research and writing skills.  The position will serve clients with corporate site location, economic development planning, and project finance and incentive matters. The position will focus on researching, writing and developing economic development plans, researching and developing economic development program applications and negotiating for project financing funding, serving as an advisor to companies and communities on economic development matters including workforce development, researching and developing applications and negotiating the provision of infrastructure financing, land use changes, tax incentives, compensation agreements, construction material sales tax exemptions for public-private-partnership development, and other matters as assigned.  Additionally, the position will involve completing marketing work for firm services to be done in large part with the support and participation of senior Montrose Group staff.  The position will require working out of the Columbus, Ohio office on a regular basis and compensation will be commensurate with the candidate’s experience up to $70,000. The position will report directly to Nate Green, Director of Economic Development, but supervision will also be provided by Dave Robinson and Jamie Beier Grant.  Please contact Dave Robinson at drobinson@montrosegroupllc.com if you are interested in joining the Montrose Group team as Manager of Economic Development.

 

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Assistant Director for Stakeholder & Real Estate Development – St. Clair Superior Development Corporation – Cleveland, Ohio https://ohioeda.com/assistant-director-for-stakeholder-real-estate-development-st-clair-superior-development-corporation-cleveland-ohio/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 17:21:00 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14175

BACKGROUND
St. Clair Superior Development Corporation (SCSDC), in partnership with The Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Foundation (JJMMF), seeks an Assistant Director for Stakeholder & Real Estate Development who will report to the Executive Director.

SCSDC serves the St. Clair Superior neighborhood. St. Clair Superior is a unique Cleveland community with a sizeable business sector and it’s located between the city’s two largest employment centers – Downtown and University Circle. The community borders Midtown, Hough, Glenville, and Downtown neighborhoods. Once an industrial hub with factories and companies employing workers who lived in the neighborhood, today it is home to many diverse populations speaking as many as 23 languages and dialects. Many St. Clair Superior residents still work in the neighborhood they live in.

A strategic investment by the Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Foundation has created exciting momentum for the organization. The organization has a strong board of directors, a talented staff, and an exciting strategic plan focused on building a community where people live, businesses thrive, and visitors explore by connecting people, strengthening the neighborhood, and being accountable to the community. The successful candidate will have passion for Cleveland, an appreciation for the history of the neighborhood and its assets, and proven success in business and/or real estate-related development.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES
Business Development

  • Assist in building out and managing the SCSDC stakeholder membership program
  • Conduct outreach visits to businesses and meet specific targets for unique company visits and services
  • Organize happy hours, speakers, and events to support area businesses and promote B2B networking
  • Identify and track business problems and issues
  • Track and understand the workforce needs of businesses to help market open positions on the SCSDC website and social media platforms
  • Work in partnership with SCSDC’s community engagement specialist to identify ways to support entrepreneurship and business development opportunities for neighborhood residents and for anchor institutions to connect to local talent and resources
  • Lead annual membership campaign seeking support from local businesses and stakeholders for SCSDC operations
  • Maintain a database of vacant and occupied commercial spaces in the neighborhood.
  • Recruit businesses/organizations to locate to the neighborhood and connect them to resources and available real estate
  • Market and provide technical assistance for the City of Cleveland’s economic development programs
  • Staff the SCSDC Stakeholder Development Committee

Real Estate Development

  • Provide advice and assistance to developers desirous of developing in St. Clair Superior.
  • Create and maintain a complete inventory of all existing retail, office, and industrial properties in the neighborhoods including tenant lease terms and vacancy rates
  • Track real estate development projects throughout the neighborhood (including office, retail, residential, and other spaces)
  • Support the creation of an equitable development policy
  • Coordinate with SCSDC community engagement specialist to solicit resident, business, and stakeholder input in seeking regulatory approvals while maintaining SCSDC as a good neighbor.
  • Develop an understanding of the dynamics of the local real estate market and market needs
  • Assist businesses, landowners, and developers as needed with property research, predevelopment assistance, community engagement, financing, land assembly strategies
  • Assist in developing projects on time and on budget, producing attractive, financially self-supporting properties that align with the organization’s mission
  • Support the executive director in establishing positive working relationships with peers, contractors, funders (equity and debt), regulatory entities, community leaders, and government partners
  • Assist the executive director in building relationships with the real estate community, including brokers and property owners, and provide support in tenanting commercial buildings
  • Help guide real estate development projects and business openings through the City of Cleveland’s review and approval process, assisting with permits and applications
  • Manage the City of Cleveland’s Storefront Renovation Program and assist business owners and property owners through the program
  • Assist the executive director in staffing the SCSDC Placemaking Committee

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS

  • Professional experience in community based economic development, planning, real estate development, and/or business development (minimum 3-5 years)
  • Bachelor’s degree in business, economic development, real estate finance, planning, or related fields – master’s degree preferred
  • Familiarity with business development, financing, and marketing
  • Familiarity with real estate development
  • General knowledge of building and zoning codes
  • Proficiency with digital and social media (and paid social media) and tech savvy

Personal Characteristics

  • Be passionate about the opportunity to assist in the rebuild of a great Cleveland neighborhood.
  • Be a creative self-starter
  • Strong networking and relationship building skills
  • Resourceful and entrepreneurial orientation and high energy personality
  • Exceptional written, oral, and interpersonal communication skills
  • Self-starter, resourceful, learner, and accountable for results
  • Excellent time management and ability to manage and execute a project
  • Works independently and in a team environment
  • Comfortable speaking with elected officials and senior cabinet members as well as residents
  • Understands the connection between economic development and community development with an equity lens

SALARY
The salary range for this position is $60,000 to $62,500.

APPLICATION PROCESS
Applications must be received by Thursday, February 24th at 5pm.

Please forward your resume along with a cover letter in .pdf form to apply@stclairsuperior.org with the subject line “Application for SCSDC Stakeholder Position”.

St. Clair Superior Development Corporation is currently working inperson from our office in Cleveland; therefore, we require all applicants to be vaccinated for COVID-19 and to provide proof of vaccination.

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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2022 Educational Webinar Opportunities https://ohioeda.com/2022-educational-webinar-opportunities/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 13:50:36 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14166

OEDA educational webinars are offered throughout the year.  Discounted packages are available.

Please note:  If you are joining/renewing your membership now and are paying by check, please email our office before you attempt to register for any events.  Our database administrator will need to update your member status before you may register at the member rate, while your payment is pending.
Thank you for your understanding.

 

 

More Information Coming Soon…

 

 

OEDA Professional Development Programs are made possible through the generous support of our Annual Investors!

 

 

Each webinar provides 1.5 hours or 3. 5 hours (for the Impact series) of elective credit for the Ohio Certified Economic Developer (OhioCED) credential.  Initial certification requires 24 hours of elective credit within three years. Once certified, an OhioCED must complete 16 hours of approved continuing education each year to maintain their credential.  For more information click HERE.

 

AICP members can earn 1.5 hours or 3.5 hours (depending on the length of the webinar) of Certification Maintenance (CM) credits for each individual webinar.  More information about AICP’s CM program can be found at planning.org/cm.

 

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Community & Economic Development Specialist III – Montgomery County, Ohio https://ohioeda.com/community-economic-development-specialist-iii-montgomery-county-ohio/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 19:02:15 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14161
Salary:  $54,828.80 – $67,204.80 Annually
Location:  451 W. Third St., OH
Job Type:  Full-time Regular (Exempt)
Department:  DS – Community & Economic Development
Job Number:  04561
Position Overview
Advanced professional level in the community & economic development occupation under general supervision of the Economic Development Manager requiring considerable knowledge of the rules, methods and requirements of community/economic development planning and development programs and services in order to create/operate multi-jurisdictional development programs and projects and to provide the planning, analysis and support services needed to promote economic development opportunities in Montgomery County. The CED Specialist III will also manage the paperwork and processes connected with several programs, as well as assist with social media and communications.
Summary of Job Duties

Assists in the maintenance, development and coordination of resources for businesses of all sizes; manages the economic development website and other economic development marketing; researches, proposes and creates economic development marketing strategies and tactics (i.e., monitors and promotes economic development within Montgomery County – evaluates potential for business revitalization and analyzes existing conditions and programs in targeted areas); responds to site selector requests and business attraction projects; manages the industrial/commercial property database; manages and develops content for economic development social media accounts; creates, develops and implements funding programs that attract businesses to the County (i.e., plans and prepares descriptions of proposed economic development project objectives, financing, schedules and estimates of impact on targeted areas); develops and implements plans for establishing new or improving existing private business associations and community development corporations, informs business of available incentives and services, provides support services to individual businesses and business associations, arranges for the provision of services or recommends improvements and expansions to foster increased business activity; researches governmental and private sources of funding for projects, determines if projects are appropriate for targeted areas; develops and implements plans and strategies for business attraction and retention.

Performs business retention and expansion activities to build and maintain relationships with the business community; serves as a point person for businesses through face-to-face, e-mail, phone, web interaction; provides technical assistance to business organizations, assists associations in preparation and distribution of promotional materials; manages business attraction/development projects under the direction of the Manager; plans, monitors and promotes economic and community development activities for Montgomery County in the region, state, nation and internationally; plans departmental events and activities when necessary. Visit project sites or attend meetings, meets with business and community groups to discuss projects, gain community support and cooperation and to elicit suggestions, acts as lead professional over assigned Community & Economic Development Specialists I & II to implement projects.  Composes contract Scope of Services and work programs for individual projects; prepares budgets for each project and monitors for compliance throughout the term of the contract; Builds and maintains relationships with community partners and the regional economic development community, including BusinessFirst! for a Greater Dayton Region business retention program, Montgomery County Workforce, Dayton Development Coalition, Jobs Ohio, local chambers of commerce, local colleges and universities, and others.  Reviews and negotiates with jurisdictions’ work scope and budgets for each project, reviews contracts to determine fiscal soundness and compliance with Federal, State and/or City requirements, conducts planning, implementation and monitoring activities associated with the planning efforts of the division including the funding processes.  Acts as a consultant to boards, agencies and community organizations, provides expert advice to high level jurisdiction officials regarding economic development, attends meetings of business associations or community groups and organizations to discuss community/economic development projects and business environment problems, may participate as a member of various boards and committees for specific development projects, prepares reports on economic development activities, reviews and analyzes impact of new legislation on business development and revitalization efforts, records the activities of contracted agencies.
Uses customer relationship management programs, Zoom, Microsoft Teams and project management tools to ensure open communication and information sharing with appropriate partners.

Represents Montgomery County at high profile functions and regional events and takes an active role in regional economic development initiatives.

(Performs Related Duties as Required)

 

Minimum Qualifications and Requirements

Must have current valid Ohio driver’s license with acceptable driving record.  Bachelor’s degree in business administration or community planning or public administration or urban studies and four (4) years related experience in economic development, community development and planning & project management.

(Other Evidences May Be Substituted)

Supplemental Information
Must maintain licensure.


More Information
https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/montgomery/jobs/3381987/economic-development-specialist-iii  OR https://bit.ly/MCOhioCEDSpec3

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Northeast Ohio Four County Regional Planning and Development Organization – Request For Proposals (RFP) for EDA Economic Recovery and Resiliency Planning Services https://ohioeda.com/northeast-ohio-four-county-regional-planning-and-development-organization-request-for-proposals-rfp-for-eda-economic-recovery-and-resiliency-planning-services/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 15:48:22 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14143

The Northeast Ohio Four County Regional Planning and Development Organization (NEFCO) seeks a qualified vendor to assist NEFCO staff with executing and completing a regional economic recovery and resiliency (ER&R) planning process and ER&R Plan document for Portage, Stark, Summit, and Wayne Counties, and satisfying the requirements and deliverables of NEFCO’s U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) CARES Act grant.

NEFCO seeks the assistance of an experienced vendor that can help NEFCO complete a planning process it started in 2020. The experienced vendor should have a team who understands public sector comprehensive planning, regional councils of government, economic development planning, meeting facilitation, and report compilation to assist NEFCO and its constituent governments with completing all of services and deliverables identified in this RFP.

Please click HERE for the full RFP, including instructions, terms and conditions, deliverables, timeline, interested party qualifications, and evaluation criteria. Proposal deadline is 5:00pm on February 14, 2022. Please contact Nick Lautzenheiser, NEFCO Economic Development Planner, at (330) 316-3719 or nick@nefcoplanning.org with questions.

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Economic Development Assistant Director – City of Covington, KY https://ohioeda.com/assistant-director-city-of-covington-ky/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 15:36:56 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14139

The City of Covington is currently accepting applications for an Assistant Director!

The Assistant Director must be a proven leader with extensive knowledge and background in economic development, economic development finance, business attraction, entrepreneurship, business retention and expansion, real estate development, municipal planning, building, and/or development services. The individual must have strong political acumen and the ability to work effectively with a full range of City officials, employees, community organizations, regional and state economic development organizations and the public.

Salary Range: $70,000.00 – $90,000.00

http://www.covingtonky.gov/job-listings

Applications will be accepted through February 7th.

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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Delaware Welcomes Economic Development Coordinator https://ohioeda.com/delaware-welcomes-economic-development-coordinator/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 15:19:07 +0000 https://ohioeda.com/?p=14136

The City of Delaware welcomes Cody Hatten as its new Economic Development Coordinator.

Hatten previously served in various capacities with the Lawrence Economic Development Corporation in Lawrence County, Ohio. His positions included Economic Development Specialist and Director of the Convention & Visitors Bureau.

Hatten’s experience in economic development began in 2016, when he served as associate director in the development office in Wayne County, West Virginia. His experience includes property marketing, business retention and expansion, social media management and grant writing.

“Cody brings good experience to this role,” said Sean Hughes, Economic Development Director for the City of Delaware. “His background in economic development and digital marketing will serve as a great addition to our team and our ongoing efforts.”

Courtney Hendershot, who previously served as Economic Development Coordinator, has been promoted to Economic Development Project Manager for the City of Delaware.

“She did a fantastic job in the coordinator role, and I look forward to the projects she will accomplish in this new capacity,” Hughes said.

Hatten graduated from Marshall University with his MBA. He is currently a Delaware resident and enjoys visiting the many unique restaurants and shops that the City of Delaware has to offer.

A Team Effort: Bringing Intel to Ohio

Intel’s announcement to partner with Ohio to expand its chip manufacturing operations in Ohio’s Licking County is a tremendous victory for the United States. Semiconductors are a brand-new vital industry to our state and will supercharge Ohio’s economy.

read more

Community Partners Outline Plans for Uptown Cincinnati’s Five Core Neighborhoods

Uptown Consortium Inc.’s (UCI) community partners are gearing up for a year of collaboration, relationship-building and community engagement. Projects in Uptown’s five core neighborhoods: Avondale, Clifton, Corryville, University Heights (CUF) and Mt. Auburn are in various stages of development—but all with the goal of maintaining Uptown’s status as one of Cincinnati’s most vibrant and eclectic areas.

read more

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